Posts Tagged Repairs

Mini-Lathe DRO Battery Life

The Mini-Lathe DROs eat a 390 alkaline coin cell a year, more or less:

Mini-Lathe DRO - battery life
Mini-Lathe DRO – battery life

The other DRO’s cell was 10 mV higher, so it might have survived another few weeks. I’ll call it a year, as the OEM cells failed half a year after I got the thing and these are the second set.

The last time I did this, I wedged a thin foam sheet below the display PCB to put a bit more pressure on the (+) contact tab sticking down from the middle of the plate:

Mini-Lathe DRO - battery compartment
Mini-Lathe DRO – battery compartment

The (-) contact is a pad on the PCB below the battery compartment. The glaring metal reflector is part of the curved cell retainer.

I still wish the DROs didn’t collide with the compound slide, but you can get used to anything if you do it long enough.

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Huion H610Pro (V2) Tablet vs. Ubuntu 18.04

Given the hassle involved with getting my ancient Wacom Graphire3 tablet working with various Linux versions, I was unsurprised to find a Huion H610Pro (V2) tablet (*) didn’t quite work out of the box.

Good old lsusb showed the tablet’s USB info:

lsusb
Bus 002 Device 002: ID 8087:0024 Intel Corp. Integrated Rate Matching Hub
Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
Bus 001 Device 004: ID 248a:ff0f  
Bus 001 Device 007: ID 058f:9410 Alcor Micro Corp. Keyboard
Bus 001 Device 006: ID 047d:1020 Kensington Expert Mouse Trackball
Bus 001 Device 005: ID 046d:c508 Logitech, Inc. Cordless Trackball
Bus 001 Device 003: ID 0451:2046 Texas Instruments, Inc. TUSB2046 Hub
Bus 001 Device 002: ID 8087:0024 Intel Corp. Integrated Rate Matching Hub
Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
Bus 004 Device 006: ID 05e3:0748 Genesys Logic, Inc. 
Bus 004 Device 005: ID 0480:a202 Toshiba America Inc Canvio Basics HDD
Bus 004 Device 004: ID 0bda:0411 Realtek Semiconductor Corp. 
Bus 004 Device 003: ID 0451:8041 Texas Instruments, Inc. 
Bus 004 Device 002: ID 0bda:0411 Realtek Semiconductor Corp. 
Bus 004 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0003 Linux Foundation 3.0 root hub
Bus 003 Device 006: ID 256c:006d  
Bus 003 Device 004: ID 0bda:5411 Realtek Semiconductor Corp. 
Bus 003 Device 003: ID 0451:8043 Texas Instruments, Inc. 
Bus 003 Device 002: ID 0bda:5411 Realtek Semiconductor Corp. 
Bus 003 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub

Yes, the space normally occupied by the product description is blank. The first blank description comes from a generic wireless keypad’s USB receiver; the 0x248a Vendor ID claims be Maxxter, a step down from the usual Logitech ID rip, and its 0xff0f Device ID looks bogus to me, too.

The 0x256c Vendor ID isn’t in the online databases yet, but some grepping found it in /lib/udev/rules.d/65-libwacom.rules:

# Huion H610 Pro
ENV{ID_BUS}=="usb", ENV{ID_VENDOR_ID}=="256c", ENV{ID_MODEL_ID}=="006e",  ENV{ID_INPUT}="1", ENV{ID_INPUT_JOYSTICK}="", ENV{ID_INPUT_TABLET}="1"
ATTRS{name}=="* Pad", ENV{ID_BUS}=="usb", ENV{ID_VENDOR_ID}=="256c", ENV{ID_MODEL_ID}=="006e",  ENV{ID_INPUT_TABLET_PAD}="1"
# Huion H610 Pro
ENV{ID_BUS}=="usb", ENV{ID_VENDOR_ID}=="256c", ENV{ID_MODEL_ID}=="006e",  ENV{ID_INPUT}="1", ENV{ID_INPUT_JOYSTICK}="", ENV{ID_INPUT_TABLET}="1"
ATTRS{name}=="* Pad", ENV{ID_BUS}=="usb", ENV{ID_VENDOR_ID}=="256c", ENV{ID_MODEL_ID}=="006e",  ENV{ID_INPUT_TABLET_PAD}="1"

Note, however, that the Device ID is 0x006e, where the upgraded V2 tablet is 0x006d; I have no idea why the number goes down as the version goes up. Change all instances of the former to the latter.

Even though the Wacom driver can apparently handle the older H610Pro, the V2 tablet’s buttons were missing in action.

The solution seems come from the Digimend project, although it also expects the 0x006e Device ID, and as is usually the case, installing the latest & greatest version, hot from GitHub, did the trick.

For this first pass, I didn’t use DKMS, which this post will remind me to do after the next kernel upgrade.

A reboot settled all the drivers into place, after which:

xsetwacom --list
HUION Huion Tablet Pen stylus   	id: 10	type: STYLUS    
HUION Huion Tablet Pad pad      	id: 11	type: PAD 

Yes, it’s “Tablet Pad pad” and capitalization is important.

For my simple needs, confining the stylus cursor to the landscape monitor makes sense. Adding this to ~/.config/startup.sh did the same thing as similar invocations for the Wacom:

xsetwacom --verbose set "HUION Huion Tablet Pen stylus" MapToOutput "DP-1"

The various buttons still need configuration, although that’s in the nature of fine tuning. The top three buttons are 1, 2, 3, with the rest tagging along at 8 through 12. They take trendy gray-on-black labeling to an absurd limit:

Huion H610Pro V2 - embedded gray-on-black buttons
Huion H610Pro V2 – embedded gray-on-black buttons

That’s with intense overhead lighting shining into the buttons and lighting up the lower-surface iconography. In normal light, they’re shiny black disks with invisible legends and, no, they’re not backlit.

The overall button-tweaking syntax:

xsetwacom set "HUION Huion Tablet Pad pad" button 12 key whatever

Where whatever comes from the list in /usr/include/X11/keysymdef.h, per the doc in man xsetwacom and a list of possibilities from:

xsetwacom --list modifiers  "HUION Huion Tablet Pad pad"

For example, this causes the bottom button to spit out a question mark:

xsetwacom set "HUION Huion Tablet Pad pad" button 12 key shift /

It’s not obvious changing the buttons from their default button numbers to anything else makes any sense; just tweaking individual programs to map those numbers into useful actions should work better.

(*) It has a “battery-free” stylus which, to my way of thinking, is a major selling point.

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American Standard Elite Kitchen Faucet: Spout Bearing Improvement

Removing the failed hot limit stop ring from the kitchen faucet reminded me of a fix I’d done a few months ago. The faucet spout eats the O-rings sealing it to the column rising out of the sink, as evidence by the far-too-many replacements I’ve installed over the years.

The O-ring replacement kit includes a pair of nylon (?) split rings which should provide bearing surfaces for the spout, but the upper ring sits in a groove putting its OD almost flush with the column:

Faucet column
Faucet column

This may be tolerance creep or just a design screwup, but the spout squashes the O-ring much more than (IMO) it should and wears it out entirely too soon.

This time around, I cut a strip of 0.4 mm thick polypropylene (from the Big Box o’ Clamshell Packages) long enough to wrap around the column and narrow enough to fit inside the groove, with the split ring holding it in place. The strip expands the ring’s OD to just barely fit inside the spout, so the spout now bears mostly on the ring, not the O-ring.

Despite measuring the groove OD and the spout ID, I had to cut-and-try several strips to find the proper thickness. Your mileage will certainly differ.

The spout now turns smoothly and freely, without leakage. We’ll see whether the new O-rings last longer than before.

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Tiny Screwdriver!

My buddy dBm took pity on my plight:

Tiny screwdriver
Tiny screwdriver

The far end has a 2.5 mm hex driver, although I’ve never encountered a nut for an M1×0.25 screw in the wild. It doesn’t fit an 0-80 nut and gulps 00-90 nuts, so it’s definitely hard metric.

My collection of glasses required an aggregate two turns of tightening, which prompted dBm to remind me of threadlock.

Done!

Thank you, dBm!

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American Standard Elite Kitchen Faucet: Hot Limit Safety Stop FAIL

During an evening KP session, the kitchen faucet handle jammed at the clockwise (hottest) end of its travel and refused to turn; it continued to move vertically and I turned off the water. This had happened before, so I knew roughly what to expect:

Am Std Elite Faucet - misaligned hot limit stop

The pointer on the red hot limit safety stop ring should be aimed just right of the front screw, at the 0 position producing maximum hotness. The scale reads backwards, perhaps in units of increasing safety.

In that position, the ring prevents the valve core from turning counterclockwise, which explains the symptoms. With the water turned off (at the ball valves in the basement) and the valve stub tilted vertically, the ring popped loose (it shouldn’t move on its own) and exposed the problem:

Am Std Elite Faucet - wrecked hot limit splines - as found
Am Std Elite Faucet – wrecked hot limit splines – as found

Neither Mary nor I recall applying that much force to the handle, but ya never know.

The flanges protruding from the stem prevent you from removing the ring, but a pair of small diagonal cutters will chop right through the plastic. If you’re one of the six people depending on the limit stop to keep the water temperature under control, you probably don’t want to cut the ring out; I have no suggestions on how to repair it.

It’s obvious the splines won’t ever be the same again:

Am Std Elite Faucet - wrecked hot limit splines - detail 1
Am Std Elite Faucet – wrecked hot limit splines – detail 1

The ring has two sets of splines and they’re both wrecked:

Am Std Elite Faucet - wrecked hot limit splines - detail 2
Am Std Elite Faucet – wrecked hot limit splines – detail 2

With the ring out of the way, it’s easy to see the trunnion shaft has moved leftward:

Am Std Elite Faucet - misaligned pivot shaft
Am Std Elite Faucet – misaligned pivot shaft

There’s essentially no clearance between the shaft and the ring, so it was rubbing against the ring, as evidenced by the red debris left behind when I tapped it to the far end of its travel:

Reassemble in reverse order and it works fine again.

I expect the shaft will resume moving leftward and eventually jam in the notch, probably after abrading the white plastic, but I don’t see how to lock it in place.

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Windows-free BIOS Update

A new-to-me Dell Optiplex 9020 needed a BIOS update, which, as always, arrives in a Windows / DOS EXE file. Because I’d already swapped in an SSD and installed Manjaro, I had to (re-)discover how to put the EXE file on a bootable DOS USB stick.

The least horrible way seemed to be perverting a known-good FreeDOS installation image:

sha256sum FD12FULL.zip 
fd353f20f509722e8b73686918995db2cd03637fa68c32e30caaca70ff94c6d2  FD12FULL.zip

Unzip it to get the USB image file, then find the partition offset:

fdisk -l FD12FULL.img
Disk FD12FULL.img: 512 MiB, 536870912 bytes, 1048576 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Device        Boot Start     End Sectors   Size Id Type
FD12FULL.img1 *       63 1048319 1048257 511.9M  6 FAT16

Mount the partition as a loop device:

sudo mount -o loop,offset=$((63*512)),uid=ed FD12FULL.img /mnt/loop

See how much space is left:

df -h /mnt/loop
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/loop0      512M  425M   87M  84% /mnt/loop

The image file is 512 MB and has 87 MB available. The BIOS file is 9.5 MB, so copy the file to the “drive”:

cp O9020A25.exe /mnt/loop

Which knocks the available space down by about what you’d expect:

df -h /mnt/loop
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/loop0      512M  435M   78M  85% /mnt/loop

Unmount the image “drive”:

sudo umount /mnt/loop

Copy the image file to a USB stick:

sudo dcfldd status=progress bs=1M if=FD12FULL.img of=/dev/sdg
512 blocks (512Mb) written.
512+0 records in
512+0 records out

Pop the USB stick in the Optiplex, set the BIOS to boot from “Legacy” ROMs, whack F12 during the reboot, pick the USB stick from the list, and It Just Works™:

BIOS Update screen
BIOS Update screen

We have a couple of other 9020s around that need the same treatment, so the effort won’t go to waste.

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Wood Board Cheese Slicer Rebolting

Long ago, a wood-base countertop cheese slicer arrived with a tenuous connection between its screw-on knob / handle and the bolt securing the cutting wire. The problem seemed to be boogered bolt threads:

Cheese slicer - original bolt
Cheese slicer – original bolt

The knob screwed firmly onto a known-good 10-24 screw, not the M5 bolt I expected, so the slicer may be old enough to be Made In America. Ya never know around here.

However, the hex head is essential, because you must hold it while tightening the nut capturing the slicing wire. Not having a 10-24 or even 10-32 bolt in hand, I went full-frontal metric with an M5 bolt.

Even with a full face shield, I don’t like standing in the plane of an abrasive cutting tool, even a piddly Dremel disk, so the slot through the head isn’t the best work I’ve ever presented:

Cheese slicer - slotted bolt head
Cheese slicer – slotted bolt head

Indeed:

Cheese slicer - skewed slot
Cheese slicer – skewed slot

But it’s hereby defined to be Good Enough™ for the purpose.

As you might expect, I ran an M5×0.8 tap into the existing 10-24 knob thread, hand-turning the lathe chuck and lining up the tap wrench with the tailstock.

Drill out the slicer’s frame hole to clear the bolt, re-string wire through slot, tighten jam nut, add a locking nut on the other side, screw on the knob, and it’s All Good:

Cheese slicer - repaired
Cheese slicer – repaired

Ugly, but good.

I expect the re-wrapped wire will break in short order, because you just can’t re-bend steel wire with impunity. So far, so good.

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