Archive for category PC Tweakage

Schwab / Symantec VIP Access vs. Yubikey

A Yubikey 5 NFC turns out to be perfectly compatible with any website using Symantec’s (no longer available) hardware key and VIP Access (definitely a misnomer) app to generate TOTP access codes, because the sites use bog-standard TOTP. The only difficulty comes from Symantec’s proprietary protocol creating the token linking an ID with a secret value to generate the TOTP codes, which is how they monetize an open standard.

Fortunately, Cyrozap reverse-engineered the Symantec protocol, dlenski mechanized it with a Python script, and it works perfectly:

python3 -m venv symkey-env
source symkey-env/bin/activate
pip3 install https://github.com/dlenski/python-vipaccess/archive/HEAD.zip
vipaccess provision -t SYMC
deactivate

That spits out a file containing the ID and secret, from which you create a QR code for the Yubikey Authenticator app:

qrencode -t UTF8 'otpauth://totp/VIP%20Access:SYMCidnumbers?secret=longsecretgibberish&issuer=Symantec&algorithm=SHA1&digits=6'

Fire up the app, wave the Yubikey behind the phone, scan the QR code, wave the Yubikey again to store it, sign in to the Schwab site, turn on 2FA, enter the ID & current TOTP value from the Yubikey Authenticator, and It Just Works™.

Of course, you can kiss Schwab’s tech support goodbye, because you’re on your own. If you ever lose the Yubikey, make sure you know the answers to your allegedly secret questions.

Equally of course, you’re downloading and running random shit from the Intertubes, but …

Now, if only all my financial institutions would get with the program.

, ,

Leave a comment

Huion H610Pro (V2) Tablet vs. xsetwacom

For unknown reasons, likely having to do with ordinary system updates, both the Huion H610Pro (V2) tablet’s device name and the display output’s name have changed. This came to light when I discovered the tablet’s stylus was no longer constrained to the landscape display, which worked fine when I set it up barely a month ago.

Running the setup command manually:

xsetwacom --verbose set "HUION Huion Tablet Pen stylus" MapToOutput "DP-1"
... Display is '(null)'.
... 'set' requested for 'HUION Huion Tablet Pen stylus'.
 <<< snippage >>>
... Checking device 'HUION Huion Tablet stylus' (11).
... Checking device 'HUION Huion Tablet eraser' (19).
Cannot find device 'HUION Huion Tablet Pen stylus'.

Apparently, the device formerly known as HUION Huion Tablet Pen stylus is now called HUION Huion Tablet stylus.

Fine, I can live with that. Try again:

xsetwacom --verbose set "HUION Huion Tablet stylus" MapToOutput "DP-1"
... Display is '(null)'.
... 'set' requested for 'HUION Huion Tablet stylus'.
 <<< snippage >>>
... Checking device 'HUION Huion Tablet stylus' (11).
... Checking device 'HUION Huion Tablet eraser' (19).
... Device 'HUION Huion Tablet stylus' (11) found.
... Found output 'VGA-1' (disconnnected)
... Found output 'DP-1' (disconnnected)
... Found output 'HDMI-1' (disconnnected)
... Found output 'DP-2' (connected)
... CRTC (2560x0) 1440x2560
... Found output 'HDMI-2' (disconnnected)
... Found output 'DP-1-8' (connected)
... CRTC (0x0) 2560x1440
... Found output 'DP-1-1' (disconnnected)
Unable to find output 'DP-1'. Output may not be connected.

Apparently, the video output formerly known as DP-1 has fissioned into DP-1-1 and DP-1-8, with only the latter connected. Weirdly, nothing happened to DP-2.

Once more, into the bleach:

xsetwacom --verbose set "HUION Huion Tablet stylus" MapToOutput "DP-1-8"
... Display is '(null)'.
... 'set' requested for 'HUION Huion Tablet stylus'.
 <<< snippage >>>
... Checking device 'HUION Huion Tablet stylus' (11).
... Checking device 'HUION Huion Tablet eraser' (19).
... Device 'HUION Huion Tablet stylus' (11) found.
... Found output 'VGA-1' (disconnnected)
... Found output 'DP-1' (disconnnected)
... Found output 'HDMI-1' (disconnnected)
... Found output 'DP-2' (connected)
... CRTC (2560x0) 1440x2560
... Found output 'HDMI-2' (disconnnected)
... Found output 'DP-1-8' (connected)
... CRTC (0x0) 2560x1440
... Setting CRTC DP-1-8
... Remapping to output area 2560x1440 @ 0,0.
... Transformation matrix:
... 	[ 0.640000 0.000000 0.000000 ]
... 	[ 0.000000 0.562500 0.000000 ]
... 	[ 0.000000 0.000000 1.000000 ]

Well, that worked.

Actually, I had to constrain the stylus to DP-2, then jam it back on DP-1-8, to spread the tablet’s horizontal extent over the entire monitor. Updating the startup script started the tablet properly the next morning.

The new device name certainly makes more sense and, perhaps, the X output connection now recognizes the landscape monitor’s ability to pass its DisplayPort video stream along to a second monitor.

,

Leave a comment

Raspberry Pi: Adding a PIXEL Desktop Launcher

The Raspberry Pi’s Raspbian PIXEL Desktop UI (not to be confused with the Google Pixel phone) descends from LXDE, with all the advantages & disadvantages that entails. One nuisance seems to be the inability to create a launcher for a non-standard program.

The stock task bar (or whatever it’s called) has a few useful launchers and you can add a launcher for a program installed through the usual Add/Remove Software function, as shown by the VLC icon:

LXDE launcher icons
LXDE launcher icons

Adding a bCNC launcher requires a bit of legerdemain, because it’s not found in the RPi repositories. Instead, install bCNC according to its directions:

… install various pre-requisites as needed …
pip2 install --upgrade git+https://github.com/vlachoudis/bCNC 

Which is also how you upgrade to the latest & greatest version, as needed.

You then launch bCNC from inside a terminal:

python2 -m bCNC

The installation includes all the bits & pieces required to create a launcher; they’re just not in the right places.

So put them there:

sudo cp ./.local/lib/python2.7/site-packages/bCNC/bCNC.png /usr/share/icons/
sudo cp .local/lib/python2.7/site-packages/bCNC/bCNC.desktop /usr/share/applications/bCNC.desktop

The bCNC.desktop file looks like this:

[Desktop Entry]
Version=1.0
Type=Application
Name=bCNC
Comment=bCNC Controller
Exec=bCNC
Icon=bCNC.png
Path=
Terminal=true
StartupNotify=false
Name[en_US]=bCNC

Set Terminal=false if you don’t want a separate terminal window and don’t care about any of the messages bCNC writes to the console during its execution. However, those messages may provide the only hint about happened as bCNC falls off the rails.

With all that in place, it turns out LXDE creates a user-specific panel configuration file only when you change the default system panel configuration. Add a VLC launcher to create the local ~/.config/lxpanel/LXDE-pi/panels/panel file.

With that ball rolled, then add the bCNC launcher:

nano .config/lxpanel/LXDE-pi/panels/panel
… add this stanza …
Plugin {
  type=launchbar
  Config {
    Button {
      id=bCNC.desktop
    }
  }
}

Log out, log back in again, and the bCNC icon should appear:

LXDE launcher icons - additions
LXDE launcher icons – additions

Click it and away you go:

bCNC - Running from LXDE Launcher
bCNC – Running from LXDE Launcher

At least you (and I) will start closer to the goal when something else changes …

, , ,

4 Comments

Obsolete DRAM Collection

As you might expect by now, I harvest various bits & pieces from the PCs falling off the trailing edge of my assortment. The bag of obsolete DRAM recently floated to the top of the heap:

DRAM Assortment - overview
DRAM Assortment – overview

Half a gig of ECC RAM from what might have been a fire-breathing Pentium Pro box:

DRAM Assortment - 256 MB ECC
DRAM Assortment – 256 MB ECC

The PCBs along the top apparently filled vacant memory slots.

Some 32 and 64 MB DRAM from a few IBM laptops I turned into picture frames:

DDR2 DRAM in assorted sizes & speeds:

DRAM Assortment - PC2 DDR
DRAM Assortment – PC2 DDR

PC133 DDR DRAM, with four sticks of 1 GB PC3 along the bottom:

DRAM Assortment - PC133
DRAM Assortment – PC133

If you look closely, you may see something you can use. No reasonable offer refused …

3 Comments

Huion H610Pro (V2) Tablet vs. Ubuntu 18.04

Given the hassle involved with getting my ancient Wacom Graphire3 tablet working with various Linux versions, I was unsurprised to find a Huion H610Pro (V2) tablet (*) didn’t quite work out of the box.

Good old lsusb showed the tablet’s USB info:

lsusb
Bus 002 Device 002: ID 8087:0024 Intel Corp. Integrated Rate Matching Hub
Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
Bus 001 Device 004: ID 248a:ff0f  
Bus 001 Device 007: ID 058f:9410 Alcor Micro Corp. Keyboard
Bus 001 Device 006: ID 047d:1020 Kensington Expert Mouse Trackball
Bus 001 Device 005: ID 046d:c508 Logitech, Inc. Cordless Trackball
Bus 001 Device 003: ID 0451:2046 Texas Instruments, Inc. TUSB2046 Hub
Bus 001 Device 002: ID 8087:0024 Intel Corp. Integrated Rate Matching Hub
Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
Bus 004 Device 006: ID 05e3:0748 Genesys Logic, Inc. 
Bus 004 Device 005: ID 0480:a202 Toshiba America Inc Canvio Basics HDD
Bus 004 Device 004: ID 0bda:0411 Realtek Semiconductor Corp. 
Bus 004 Device 003: ID 0451:8041 Texas Instruments, Inc. 
Bus 004 Device 002: ID 0bda:0411 Realtek Semiconductor Corp. 
Bus 004 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0003 Linux Foundation 3.0 root hub
Bus 003 Device 006: ID 256c:006d  
Bus 003 Device 004: ID 0bda:5411 Realtek Semiconductor Corp. 
Bus 003 Device 003: ID 0451:8043 Texas Instruments, Inc. 
Bus 003 Device 002: ID 0bda:5411 Realtek Semiconductor Corp. 
Bus 003 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub

Yes, the space normally occupied by the product description is blank. The first blank description comes from a generic wireless keypad’s USB receiver; the 0x248a Vendor ID claims be Maxxter, a step down from the usual Logitech ID rip, and its 0xff0f Device ID looks bogus to me, too.

The 0x256c Vendor ID isn’t in the online databases yet, but some grepping found it in /lib/udev/rules.d/65-libwacom.rules:

# Huion H610 Pro
ENV{ID_BUS}=="usb", ENV{ID_VENDOR_ID}=="256c", ENV{ID_MODEL_ID}=="006e",  ENV{ID_INPUT}="1", ENV{ID_INPUT_JOYSTICK}="", ENV{ID_INPUT_TABLET}="1"
ATTRS{name}=="* Pad", ENV{ID_BUS}=="usb", ENV{ID_VENDOR_ID}=="256c", ENV{ID_MODEL_ID}=="006e",  ENV{ID_INPUT_TABLET_PAD}="1"
# Huion H610 Pro
ENV{ID_BUS}=="usb", ENV{ID_VENDOR_ID}=="256c", ENV{ID_MODEL_ID}=="006e",  ENV{ID_INPUT}="1", ENV{ID_INPUT_JOYSTICK}="", ENV{ID_INPUT_TABLET}="1"
ATTRS{name}=="* Pad", ENV{ID_BUS}=="usb", ENV{ID_VENDOR_ID}=="256c", ENV{ID_MODEL_ID}=="006e",  ENV{ID_INPUT_TABLET_PAD}="1"

Note, however, that the Device ID is 0x006e, where the upgraded V2 tablet is 0x006d; I have no idea why the number goes down as the version goes up. Change all instances of the former to the latter.

Even though the Wacom driver can apparently handle the older H610Pro, the V2 tablet’s buttons were missing in action.

The solution seems come from the Digimend project, although it also expects the 0x006e Device ID, and as is usually the case, installing the latest & greatest version, hot from GitHub, did the trick.

For this first pass, I didn’t use DKMS, which this post will remind me to do after the next kernel upgrade.

A reboot settled all the drivers into place, after which:

xsetwacom --list
HUION Huion Tablet Pen stylus   	id: 10	type: STYLUS    
HUION Huion Tablet Pad pad      	id: 11	type: PAD 

Yes, it’s “Tablet Pad pad” and capitalization is important.

For my simple needs, confining the stylus cursor to the landscape monitor makes sense. Adding this to ~/.config/startup.sh did the same thing as similar invocations for the Wacom:

xsetwacom --verbose set "HUION Huion Tablet Pen stylus" MapToOutput "DP-1"

The various buttons still need configuration, although that’s in the nature of fine tuning. The top three buttons are 1, 2, 3, with the rest tagging along at 8 through 12. They take trendy gray-on-black labeling to an absurd limit:

Huion H610Pro V2 - embedded gray-on-black buttons
Huion H610Pro V2 – embedded gray-on-black buttons

That’s with intense overhead lighting shining into the buttons and lighting up the lower-surface iconography. In normal light, they’re shiny black disks with invisible legends and, no, they’re not backlit.

The overall button-tweaking syntax:

xsetwacom set "HUION Huion Tablet Pad pad" button 12 key whatever

Where whatever comes from the list in /usr/include/X11/keysymdef.h, per the doc in man xsetwacom and a list of possibilities from:

xsetwacom --list modifiers  "HUION Huion Tablet Pad pad"

For example, this causes the bottom button to spit out a question mark:

xsetwacom set "HUION Huion Tablet Pad pad" button 12 key shift /

It’s not obvious changing the buttons from their default button numbers to anything else makes any sense; just tweaking individual programs to map those numbers into useful actions should work better.

(*) It has a “battery-free” stylus which, to my way of thinking, is a major selling point.

,

1 Comment

Windows-free BIOS Update

A new-to-me Dell Optiplex 9020 needed a BIOS update, which, as always, arrives in a Windows / DOS EXE file. Because I’d already swapped in an SSD and installed Manjaro, I had to (re-)discover how to put the EXE file on a bootable DOS USB stick.

The least horrible way seemed to be perverting a known-good FreeDOS installation image:

sha256sum FD12FULL.zip 
fd353f20f509722e8b73686918995db2cd03637fa68c32e30caaca70ff94c6d2  FD12FULL.zip

Unzip it to get the USB image file, then find the partition offset:

fdisk -l FD12FULL.img
Disk FD12FULL.img: 512 MiB, 536870912 bytes, 1048576 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Device        Boot Start     End Sectors   Size Id Type
FD12FULL.img1 *       63 1048319 1048257 511.9M  6 FAT16

Mount the partition as a loop device:

sudo mount -o loop,offset=$((63*512)),uid=ed FD12FULL.img /mnt/loop

See how much space is left:

df -h /mnt/loop
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/loop0      512M  425M   87M  84% /mnt/loop

The image file is 512 MB and has 87 MB available. The BIOS file is 9.5 MB, so copy the file to the “drive”:

cp O9020A25.exe /mnt/loop

Which knocks the available space down by about what you’d expect:

df -h /mnt/loop
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/loop0      512M  435M   78M  85% /mnt/loop

Unmount the image “drive”:

sudo umount /mnt/loop

Copy the image file to a USB stick:

sudo dcfldd status=progress bs=1M if=FD12FULL.img of=/dev/sdg
512 blocks (512Mb) written.
512+0 records in
512+0 records out

Pop the USB stick in the Optiplex, set the BIOS to boot from “Legacy” ROMs, whack F12 during the reboot, pick the USB stick from the list, and It Just Works™:

BIOS Update screen
BIOS Update screen

We have a couple of other 9020s around that need the same treatment, so the effort won’t go to waste.

,

4 Comments

Manjaro Linux VNC Setup

I installed the XFCE flavor of Manjaro Linux (beside Win 8.1 Pro) on a new-to-me Dell Latitude 7250 serving as our new Token Windows box and carry-along-able Linux laptop.

Manjaro being an offshoot of Arch, they have plenty of guides and references, with How to Set up X11VNC Server being most useful at the moment. This box needs only a VNC server and apparently works with ‑xdamage for faster updates.

With the laptop plugged into an external display and Manjaro set up to use both displays, the X11VNC server feeds both to the client with the proper positioning, producing a truly panoramic, albeit scaled, view:

WinFlip - X11VNC dual screen
WinFlip – X11VNC dual screen

TightVNC on Windows does much the same thing, although (AFAICT) Windows doesn’t allow different background pictures on the two screens; that’s irrelevant to my mmmm use case.

Leave a comment