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Archive for category Recumbent Bicycling

Sandisk 32 GB High Endurance Video Monitoring Card

Despite my misgivings, “Ships from and sold by Amazon.com” suggests I could return a Sandisk 32 GB High Endurance MicroSD card if things turned out badly:

MicroSD 32 GB - Samsung EVO and SanDisk High Endurance

MicroSD 32 GB – Samsung EVO and SanDisk High Endurance

Unlike the Samsung cards, Sandisk charges a substantial premium for not buying through Amazon.

Verifying the card using f3probe produced the same results as with the earlier 64 GB card and copying the existing files from the Fly6 card (on the left) went smoothly:


rsync -rtv /mnt/Fly6/ /mnt/part

“High Endurance” means it’s rated for 5000 hours of “Full HD” recording, which they think occurs at 26 Mb/s. The Fly6 records video in 10 minutes chunks, each weighing about 500 MB, call it 1 MB/s = 8 Mb/s, a third of their nominal pace. One might reasonably expect this card to outlive the camera.

As with the AS30V, we shall see …

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Sandisk Extreme Plus: End of Life

The Fly6 rear camera on my bike started giving off three long beeps and shutting down. Doing the reformatting / rebooting dance provides only temporary relief, so I think the card has failed:

Sandisk Extreme Plus vs. Samsung EVO MicroSD cards

Sandisk Extreme Plus vs. Samsung EVO MicroSD cards

The Fly6 can handle cards up to only 32 GB, which means I should stock up before they go the way of the 8 GB card shipped with the camera a few years ago.

Some back of the envelope calculations:

  • It’s been in use for the last 19 months
  • The last 22 trips racked up 88 GB of video data = 4 GB/trip
  • They occurred over the last 6 weeks = 3.6 rides/week
  • Call it 250 trips = 1 TB of data written to the card = 32 × capacity

That’s only slightly more than the failure point of the Sony 64 GB MicroSDXC cards. The Fly6 writes about a third of the data per trip, so the card lasts longer on a calendar basis.

So now let’s find out how long the Samsung cards last …

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Hooker Avenue at Raymond: Left Turn on Red

T=0: You can’t tell, but the signals for Hooker Avenue have been yellow for several seconds and are about to turn red:

Raymond - Left on Red - 2017-10-11 - 1

Raymond – Left on Red – 2017-10-11 – 1

T+3: The opposing signals have been red for a while, but nobody much cares about that:

Raymond - Left on Red - 2017-10-11 - 2

Raymond – Left on Red – 2017-10-11 – 2

T+11: Right-turning traffic (with a green arrow) blocks his path, so he just drops to a dead stop in the middle of the intersection:

Raymond - Left on Red - 2017-10-11 - 3

Raymond – Left on Red – 2017-10-11 – 3

T+14: Finally! All clear for a left on red:

Raymond - Left on Red - 2017-10-11 - 4

Raymond – Left on Red – 2017-10-11 – 4

When a cyclist delays a driver for two, maybe three, seconds, even while riding legally, outrage occurs.

And, yeah, I’ve made mistakes, too. Happens to everybody. Cyclists seem to arouse disproportionate outrage, so I try very hard to ride within the rules and the lines.

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SRAM Shift Indicator Repair: Polypropylene Sheet

Over the course of a few weeks, both of the indicators in the SRAM grip shifters on my bike snapped off. Having recently touched my parallel jaw clamp assortment, it occurred to me I could mold snippets of polypropylene sheet (saved from random clamshell packages for just such a purpose) around the nose of a clamp and come out pretty close to the final shape:

SRAM Shift Indicator - shaped replacements

SRAM Shift Indicator – shaped replacements

A hot air gun set on LOW and held a foot away softened the polypro enough so a gloved thumb could squash it against the jaw. Too much heat shrinks the sheet into a blob, too little heat lets the sheet spring back to its original shape.

The flat tab of the original indicator is about 1 mm thick. I found a package of 47 mil = 1.2 mm sheet with one nice right-angle bend and ran with it.

Because I expect sunlight will fade any color other than black, that’s the Sharpie I applied.

They don’t look as awful as you might expect. The rear shifter, minus the cover:

SRAM Shift Indicator - rear detail

SRAM Shift Indicator – rear detail

The front shifter, with cover installed and HT PTT button below the still-good Kapton tape:

SRAM Shift Indicator - front assembled

SRAM Shift Indicator – front assembled

The transparent covers press the OEM indicators down and do the same for my homebrew tabs. I expect the Sharpie will wear quickly at those contact points; next time, I should tint the other side.

They’re rather subtle, I’ll grant you that.

Now, to see if they survive long enough to make the worry about a brighter color fading away a real problem…

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Sunglass Earpiece Trimming

Mary doesn’t like wearing the wrap-around-her-head earpieces found on sunglasses these days under her bicycle helmet, so I must trim them to fit:

Sunglass earpiece trim

Sunglass earpiece trim

Perhaps I won’t need an old pair to prepare the next set: a scant four inches from the hinge.

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Burnett Blvd at Rt 55: Passing on the Right, Redux

As usual, we’re at the Rt 55 end of Burnett Blvd, returning home from a grocery trip; I’m hauling two full bags of chow in the trailer. The white car pulling up immediately to our left will make a left turn from the left lane:

Burnett at Rt 55 - Right Pass - 2017-09-19 - 01

Burnett at Rt 55 – Right Pass – 2017-09-19 – 01

The more distant white car, turning left out of Overocker, is eases past us in the right lane to make a right turn:

Burnett at Rt 55 - Right Pass - 2017-09-19 - 02

Burnett at Rt 55 – Right Pass – 2017-09-19 – 02

We’re on the left side of the right lane, rather than the right, to avoid right hook collisions with drivers who flat-out do not stop before turning. Been there, had that happen, we know better.

The car approaching in the right lane will attempt to pass us on the right:

Burnett at Rt 55 - Right Pass - 2017-09-19 - 03

Burnett at Rt 55 – Right Pass – 2017-09-19 – 03

That’s happened before, too, so I’m watching this happen in  my mirror. My line will pass to the right of the inconveniently placed manhole cover in the intersection:

Burnett at Rt 55 - Right Pass - 2017-09-19 - 04

Burnett at Rt 55 – Right Pass – 2017-09-19 – 04

Mary’s nearing the right side of the lane, I’m in the middle, and the driver jams to a stop rather than run up over the sidewalk:

Burnett at Rt 55 - Right Pass - 2017-09-19 - 05

Burnett at Rt 55 – Right Pass – 2017-09-19 – 05

The passenger window is rolling down, which is always a Bad Sign:

Burnett at Rt 55 - Right Pass - 2017-09-19 - 06

Burnett at Rt 55 – Right Pass – 2017-09-19 – 06

It’s all the way down and I know what’s about to happen:

Burnett at Rt 55 - Right Pass - 2017-09-19 - 07

Burnett at Rt 55 – Right Pass – 2017-09-19 – 07

So I preempt the discussion by pointing out she was passing in an intersection and the license plate on the silver Chevy say FEX-4194:

Burnett at Rt 55 - Right Pass - 2017-09-19 - 08

Burnett at Rt 55 – Right Pass – 2017-09-19 – 08

She passes Mary and stops directly ahead of us in the middle of the right-hand lane. We jam to a stop behind her. The black car approaching us swerves into the middle lane:

Burnett at Rt 55 - Right Pass - 2017-09-19 - 09

Burnett at Rt 55 – Right Pass – 2017-09-19 – 09

She pulls around the corner onto Manchester and stops in the intersection. I stop well behind her to remain visible from Rt 55, which turns out to be a Good Idea:

Burnett at Rt 55 - Right Pass - 2017-09-19 - 10

Burnett at Rt 55 – Right Pass – 2017-09-19 – 10

Mary eases beside the drivers window, which rolls down. The driver says she’s going to call the police, “because we pulled directly in front of her”. Mary points out we have video of the entire encounter. The window rolls up and the driver pulls away.

Overocker, Burnett, and a short sprint on Rt 55 to Manchester is the only route from the grocery store to Rt 376 and home, so it’s not like we’re looking for trouble.

No helmet camera video, alas, because I tried those piece-of-crap Wasabi batteries in the Sony HDR-AS30V and the second one was flat-out dead. The first one, in the camera when I left home, showed empty after the half-hour ride to the grocery store, so they really are junk; “Premium Japanese cells” my foot.

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Tour Easy Headset Wrench

The headset on my Tour Easy ‘bent worked its way loose, which led to a disturbing discovery: the headset wrench I made from a discarded flat wrench vanished with the shop tools donated to MakerSmiths.

Fortunately, we live in the future:

Tour Easy Headset Wrench - Slic3r preview

Tour Easy Headset Wrench – Slic3r preview

A thin plastic wrench is absolutely no good for torquing down the locknut, but that’s not what it’s for. Adjust the bearing race to the proper preload with this wrench, hold it in place, then torque the locknut with the BFW.

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

Now, I’d like to say that was easy, but in actual point of fact …

First, I forgot to divide by cos(180/6) to convert the across-the-flats size to the diameter of OpenSCAD’s circumscribed hexagon-as-circle, which made the wrench uselessly small:

Tour Easy Headset Wrench - v1

Tour Easy Headset Wrench – v1

If you have a 28 mm nut with low torque requirements, though, I’ve got your back.

While I had the hood up, I slenderized the handle into a much shapelier figure:

Tour Easy Headset Wrench

Tour Easy Headset Wrench

Trotting off to the garage with a warm plastic wrench in hand, I discovered the blindingly obvious fact that the headset nuts have eight sides. On the upside, the number of sides became a parameter, so, should you happen to need a five-sided wrench (perhaps on Mars), you can have one.

So, yeah, it’s rapid prototyping in full effect:

Tour Easy Headset Wrench Iterations

Tour Easy Headset Wrench Iterations

Remember, kids, never design while distracted …

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