Rail Trail: Fallen Tree Clearing

We rolled up to a pair of walkers who had just watched a long-dead tree fall across the Dutchess Rail Trail ahead of them:

Rail Trail - fallen tree - 2021-09-15
Rail Trail – fallen tree – 2021-09-15

Which is why I now carry a fold-out pruning saw in my tool kit:

Rail Trail - fallen tree - cleared - 2021-09-15
Rail Trail – fallen tree – cleared – 2021-09-15

The mowing crew we encountered half a mile ahead had a chainsaw and cleared the remainder.

Stay alert out there!

Although I don’t have a picture, there was a freshly dead bat lying underneath the main trunk. I think it rode the tree down, only to get slapped hard against the gravel beside the trail. I’m sure bats power up faster than I do, but not quite fast enough.

Micro-Mark Bandsaw: Acetal Blade Guide

The Micro-Mark bandsaw has a metal blade guide below the table that contributes to the awful noise it makes while running, even when it’s not cutting anything. Having recently touched the Delrin = acetal rod stash, a simple project came to mind.

A doodle with the original metal guide dimensions:

Micro-Mark Bandsaw - metal blade guide dimensions
Micro-Mark Bandsaw – metal blade guide dimensions

The 10 mm dimension is non-critical, so I started with a 1/2 inch acetal rod and turned the stub end to match.

A doodle suggested how to carve the slot with a 20.5 mil = 0.52 mm slitting saw, with the offset from a Z touchoff at the top:

Micro-Mark Bandsaw - acetal blade guide - slitting doodles
Micro-Mark Bandsaw – acetal blade guide – slitting doodles

The V block setup required swapping out the overly long OEM screw for a shorter 5 mm SHCS to clear the Sherline’s motor:

Micro-Mark Bandsaw - acetal guide slitting
Micro-Mark Bandsaw – acetal guide slitting

The end result looked pretty good:

Micro-Mark Bandsaw - acetal vs steel blade guides
Micro-Mark Bandsaw – acetal vs steel blade guides

And it looks like it pretty much belongs in the saw:

Micro-Mark Bandsaw - acetal blade guide installed
Micro-Mark Bandsaw – acetal blade guide installed

The 6 mm stud goes into a hole in the frame, where a setscrew holds it in place. You must remove the blade to extract / replace the guide, with the correct position having the end of the slot just touching the back of the blade.

The foam ring apparently keeps crud away from the stud on the backside; I doubt it’s mission-critical.

The saw became somewhat quieter; the ball bearing guides above the table now generate most of the racket. At some point I’ll try replacing them with a block, probably made from UHMW, with a simple slit to guide the blade.

Plastic guides may not last as long as the steel ones, but occasional replacements will be worth it if the saw runs quieter.

Bondhus Wrench: Missing Ball

Around the beginning of the year, I updated my collection of somewhat worn hex wrenches with a set of metric and inch ball-end hex wrenches from Bondhus sold by and shipped from Amazon:

Bondhus hex wrenches - missing 7-64 ball
Bondhus hex wrenches – missing 7-64 ball

When I applied the 7/64 wrench to a setscrew, the missing ball came as a surprise.

Even though the inch wrench set doesn’t get a lot of use, it’s possible I broke the ball off during a previous adventure, but a look at the end shows the black oxide coating covering the end:

Bondhus hex wrenches - missing 7-64 ball - detail
Bondhus hex wrenches – missing 7-64 ball – detail

Yeah, it was born that way.

I wonder if and how their lifetime guarantee works.

Protip: as of this writing, the Amazon listing has two other “sizes” showing exactly the same set at significantly higher prices from two randomly named sellers:

Bondhus hex wrench set - Amazon listing
Bondhus hex wrench set – Amazon listing

It is safe to assume Amazon no longer has its customers’ best interests in mind.

Tenergy 18650 Lithium Cells: Four Years of Running Lights

With the amber daytime running light connected to the Bafang’s headlight output and the Anker flashlight on the other side of the fairing getting fewer power-on hours, it’s a good time to see how those four Tenergy lithium 18650 cells are doing:

Tenergy 18650 Protected - 2021-09-09
Tenergy 18650 Protected – 2021-09-09

The overall capacity is down by 10%, with the voltage depressed by 120 mV over most of the curve.

Although I don’t keep daily records, the back of the envelope reveals 150 to 200 hour-long rides per year during the last four years, so call it 700 charging cycles:

Anker LC40 Flashlight - Anodizing fade
Anker LC40 Flashlight – Anodizing fade

High brightness draws 1.5 A and low is 50% duty cycle, so a typical ride requires 750 mA·h = 2.5 W·h. Each cell lives for three or four rides with the LED set to low brightness and the numbers work out close enough.

Depth Gauge Mounting Rods

A depth gauge arrived with a 3/8 inch = 9.5 mm mounting rod that fit one of my magnetic bases, but another base in my collection has a 5/16 inch = 7.9 mm clamp. Having recently rummaged through the aluminum rod stash, this happened:

Depth Gauge mounting rods
Depth Gauge mounting rods

The original rod at the top has an M6 thread, the drawer of random M6 screws provided suitable volunteers, and a bit of lathe work removed / shaped their heads accordingly.

The shorter rod has a blind hole, with a dab of epoxy holding the headless screw in place. Not that it matters, but the lathe held them in alignment for curing:

Depth Gauge mounting rod - epoxy alignment
Depth Gauge mounting rod – epoxy alignment

The longer rod got drilled all the way through, with more epoxy holding the screw, and, even with a relatively loose fit, no worries about alignment.

The longer rod gets the clamp away from the depth gauge’s base plate for better positioning:

Depth Gauge mounting rod - in use
Depth Gauge mounting rod – in use

They’ll surely come in handy along the way …

Bat House

We found this critter while checking for water after Hurricane Ida drenched the area:

Bat on attic vent
Bat on attic vent

It’s on the outside of the vent screen and we have no objection.

We should put up a bat house to encourage more of its friends to hang out with us …