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Posts Tagged M2

Fireball Island Figures

A cousin asked if my 3D printer could replace some figures gone missing from their old Fireball Island game board, a classic apparently coming out in a new & improved version.

Fortunately, solid models exist on Thingiverse:

Fireball Island figure - Thingiverse 536867

Fireball Island figure – Thingiverse 536867

Unfortunately, the left arm requires support, which Slic3r supplies with great exuberance:

Fireball Island figure - Slic3r support

Fireball Island figure – Slic3r support

The vast tower on the figure’s right side (our left) seemed completely unnecessary, not to mention I have no enthusiasm for the peril inherent in chopping away so much plastic, so I replaced it with a simple in-model pillar:

Figure Support Mods

Figure Support Mods

The pillar leans from an adhesion-enhancing lily pad and ends one layer below the left hand, with all dimensions and angles chosen on the fly to make the answer come out right.

Works like a champ:

Fireball Island Figures - orange - on platform

Fireball Island Figures – orange – on platform

The dark band down the middle comes from the Pixel’s shutter.

They emerged with some PETG hair, the removal of which I left as an end-user experience.

I mailed a small box containing figures printed in my (limited!) palette of four colors, some spares Just In Case™, and a few QC rejects showing the necessity of lily pads.

Game on!

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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Tour Easy Daytime Running Light: First Fracture

A wind gust pushed Mary’s bike over with the daytime running light on the downward side:

Fairing Flashlight Mount - Fracture

Fairing Flashlight Mount – Fracture

Frankly, it’s better to have a cheap and easily replaceable plastic widget break, instead of something expensive and hard to find.

Because we live in the future, a replacement part was just a few hours away:

M2 - Nozzle Z Offset Recal - DRL Clamp

M2 – Nozzle Z Offset Recal – DRL Clamp

Well, a few hours after installing a replacement thermistor and recalibrating the M2, but nested repairs happen every now and again.

To the road!

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Makergear M2: Nozzle Z Offset Recalibration

After a few days of downtime, an Official Makergear Thermistor arrived and is now installed amid a dab of heatsink compound:

M2 - Thermistor with heatsink compound

M2 – Thermistor with heatsink compound

With the hot end set a bit higher than usual, position the platform at Z=0, lower the nozzle to be flat on the platform, tighten the lock screw, then run off a set of large calibration squares:

M2 - Nozzle Z Offset Recal - first test

M2 – Nozzle Z Offset Recal – first test

The scrambled square in the front left says the Z=0 nozzle position came out just a bit too far above the platform and, indeed, the measurements (upper left numbers) say it’s off by 0.15-ish mm:

M2 Nozzle and Platform Re-Cal Measurements

M2 Nozzle and Platform Re-Cal Measurements

Probably a little PETG stuck to the nozzle; I hate adjusting things when they’re burning hot.

The walls are also thin by a smidge, but the first order of business is to reset the Z offset with M206 Z=-2.15. With that in hand, the second set of squares came out at 3.00 to 3.08 mm (lower left numbers), which I defined to be Close Enough.

The 0.08 mm variation across the platform isn’t enough to worry about.

The first skirt threads were too thick and not solidly bonded together, but the second skirt came out normally, with a thickness from 0.21 through 0.30, which is also Good Enough.

The three-thread walls were still 1.15 mm, rather than 1.20 mm, so the EM should go from 0.95 to 0.95*1.20/1.15 = 1.05.

Next, a set of single-thread thinwall boxes to verify the Z offset and recheck the Extrusion Multiplier:

M2 - Nozzle Z Offset Recal - thinwall test

M2 – Nozzle Z Offset Recal – thinwall test

They’re dead on 3.00 mm tall, varying by not enough to worry about.

Their single-thread walls are 0.38 mm, not the intended 0.40, which suggests the EM should become 0.95*0.40/0.35 = 1.00.

It turns out the filament diameter at this part of the roll is scant of 1.75 mm, maybe 1.73 mm, so I decided to not fiddle with the EM.

The first production part came out fine:

M2 - Nozzle Z Offset Recal - DRL Clamp

M2 – Nozzle Z Offset Recal – DRL Clamp

The flange around the bottom of the arch support grid (in the middle) is intentional; it’s not an overstuffed first layer. The clamp sections rise from the platform just like they grew there.

So the M2 is back in operation and I have a spare thermistor on the shelf!

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M2 DIY Thermistor Rebuild: Autopsy

Not much to my surprise, my hack-job thermistor rebuild went bad:

M2 - thermistor - assembly 2

M2 – thermistor – assembly 2

Having nothing to lose, I heated the brass tube over a butane flame to wreck the epoxy, which blew out with a satisfactory bang and filled the Basement Laboratory with The Big Stink.

Much to my surprise, the active ingredient still worked:

M2 DIY thermistor corpse

M2 DIY thermistor corpse

The multimeter reported absolutely no intermittent dropouts for as long as I was willing to watch the trace while doing other things:

DIY Thermistor Autopsy - Resistance Trend

DIY Thermistor Autopsy – Resistance Trend

So it must be my crappy soldering technique.

A brace of real M2 thermistors will arrive shortly …

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Rubber Soaker Hose Repair

A soaker hose leaped under a descending garden fork and accumulated a nasty gash:

Soaker Hose Splice - gashed

Soaker Hose Splice – gashed

Mary deployed a spare and continued the mission, while I pondered how to fix such an odd shape.

For lack of anything smarter, I decided to put a form-fitting clamp around the hose, with silicone caulk buttered around the gash to (ideally) slow down any leakage:

Soaker Hose Splice - Solid Model - Assembled

Soaker Hose Splice – Solid Model – Assembled

As usual, some doodling got the solid model started:

Soaker Hose Splice - Dimension doodle 1

Soaker Hose Splice – Dimension doodle 1

A hose formed from chopped rubber doesn’t really have consistent dimensions, so I set up the model to spit out small test pieces:

Soaker Hose Splice - Test Fit - Slic3r

Soaker Hose Splice – Test Fit – Slic3r

Lots and lots of test pieces:

Soaker Hose Splice - test pieces

Soaker Hose Splice – test pieces

Each iteration produced a better fit, although the dimensions never really converged:

Soaker Hose Splice - Dimension doodle 2

Soaker Hose Splice – Dimension doodle 2

The overall model looks about like you’d expect:

Soaker Hose Splice - Complete - Slic3r

Soaker Hose Splice – Complete – Slic3r

The clamp must hold its shape around a hose carrying 100 psi (for real!) water, so I put 100 mil aluminum backing plates on either side. Were you doing this for real, you’d shape the plates with a CNC mill, but I just bandsawed them to about the right size and transfer-punched the hole positions:

Soaker Hose Splice - plate transfer punch

Soaker Hose Splice – plate transfer punch

Some drill press action with a slightly oversize drill compensated for any misalignment and Mr Disk Sander rounded the corners to match the plastic block:

Soaker Hose Splice - plate corner rounding

Soaker Hose Splice – plate corner rounding

A handful of stainless steel 8-32 screws holds the whole mess together:

Soaker Hose Splice - installed

Soaker Hose Splice – installed

These hoses spend their lives at rest under a layer of mulch, so I’m ignoring the entire problem of stress relief at those sharp block edges. We’ll see how this plays out in real life, probably next year.

I haven’t tested it under pressure, but it sure looks capable!

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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Tour Easy Front Fender Clip: Longer and Stronger

We negotiated the Belmar Bridge connection stairway from the Allegheny River Trail to the Sandy Creek trail:

Belmar Bridge Stairs - Overview

Belmar Bridge Stairs – Overview

We’re maneuvering Mary’s bike, but you get the general idea. Our bikes aren’t built for stairways, particularly ones with low overheads:

Belmar Bridge Stairs - Low Overhead

Belmar Bridge Stairs – Low Overhead

The front fender clip on my Tour Easy snapped (at the expected spots) when the mudflap snagged on one of the angles:

Belmar Bridge Stairs - First Turn

Belmar Bridge Stairs – First Turn

For some inexplicable reason, I didn’t have a roll of duct tape in my packs, so the temporary repair required a strip of tape from a battery pack, two snippets of hook-and-loop tape, and considerable muttering:

Tour Easy front fender clip - expedient repair

Tour Easy front fender clip – expedient repair

It was good for two dozen more miles to the end of our vacation, so I’d say that was Good Enough.

The new version has holes in the ferrules ten stay diameters deep, instead of six, which might eliminate the need for heatstink tubing. I added a small hole at the joint between the curved hooks and the ferrules to force more plastic into those spots:

Front Fender Clip - Slic3r

Front Fender Clip – Slic3r

I also bent the hanger extension to put the fender’s neutral position closer to the wheel.

We’ll see how long this one lasts. By now, I now have black double-sticky foam tape!

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

As a bonus for paging all the way to the end, here’s the descent on the same stairway:

Belmar Bridge Stairs - Descent

Belmar Bridge Stairs – Descent

No, I wasn’t even tempted …

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Tour Easy Front Derailleur Cable Clamp

In addition to sawing through the side of the cable ferrule, the front derailleur cable began breaking at the edge of the derailleur arm:

Tour Easy Front Derailleur Cable - frayed

Tour Easy Front Derailleur Cable – frayed

It wouldn’t have survived another ride!

Dan pointed out CNC machined aluminum cable clamps are a thing, but those are sized for larger frame tubes than the 1.0 inch steel used on our Tour Easy ‘bents and, although I’ve shimmed everything else on the frame, I wanted to tweak the cable angle to match the arm on the derailleur.

A bit of OpenSCAD wrangling produces a likely candidate:

Front Derailleur Cable Clamp - Slic3r

Front Derailleur Cable Clamp – Slic3r

That’s a bulked-up revision of the prototype:

Tour Easy Front Derailleur Cable Clamp - installed

Tour Easy Front Derailleur Cable Clamp – installed

Done up in orange PETG, it demonstrated the idea worked, but two perimeter threads wrapped around 15% infill isn’t quite up to the task. Note the split along the screw on the far half and various irregularities around the ferrule.

The cable angle isn’t quite right, either, as the proper compound angle would, alas, aim the cable into the pedal crank. The bulky bushings get in the way of putting the ferrule where it should be with the screws aligned in a tidy manner, so I must get used to the jaunty angle.

The bulkier version, done with 50% infill and four perimeter threads, has the same tilt angle, but the ferrule sits further from the screws:

Tour Easy Front Derailleur Cable Clamp V2 - rear quarter view

Tour Easy Front Derailleur Cable Clamp V2 – rear quarter view

The view from the left side shows the cable angles slightly to the rear, but the smaller angle should make it happier:

Tour Easy Front Derailleur Cable Clamp V2 - side view

Tour Easy Front Derailleur Cable Clamp V2 – side view

Probably should have used black PETG. Next time, for sure!

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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