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Posts Tagged M2

CNC 3018-Pro: Tape-Down Platter Fixture

Diamond drag engraving doesn’t put much sideways force on the platters, so taping the CD in place suffices to hold it:

CNC 3018-Pro - CD taped to platform
CNC 3018-Pro – CD taped to platform

Wrapping a flange around the screw-down platter fixture provides plenty of surface area for tape:

Platter Fixtures - CD on 3018 - tape flange
Platter Fixtures – CD on 3018 – tape flange

Which looks exactly as you think it would in real life:

CNC 3018-Pro - CD fixture - taped
CNC 3018-Pro – CD fixture – taped

Admittedly, masking tape doesn’t look professional, but it’s low-profile, cheap and works perfectly. Blue painter’s tape for the “permanent” hold-down strips on the platform would be a colorful upgrade.

It’s centered on the platform at the XY=0 origin in the middle of the XY travel limits, with edges aligned parallel to the axes. Homing the 3018 and moving to XY=0 puts the tool point directly over the center of the CD without any fussy alignment.

The blue-and-red rings around the center hole assist probe camera alignment, whenever that’s necessary.

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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CNC 3018-Pro: LM6UU Linear-bearing Diamond Drag Bit Holder

The CNC 3018-Pro normally holds a small DC motor with a nicely cylindrical housing,so this was an easy adaptation of the MPCNC’s diamond drag bit holder:

CNC 3018-Pro - Diamond bit - overview
CNC 3018-Pro – Diamond bit – overview

The lip around the bottom part rests atop the tool clamp, with the spring reaction plate sized to clear the notch in the Z-axis stage.

The solid model looks about like you’d expect:

Diamond Scribe - Mount - solid model
Diamond Scribe – Mount – solid model

The New Thing compared to the MPCNC holder is wrapping LM6UU bearings around an actual 6 mm shaft, instead of using LM3UU bearings for the crappy diamond bit shank:

CNC 3018-Pro - Diamond bit - epoxy curing
CNC 3018-Pro – Diamond bit – epoxy curing

I cut the shank in two pieces, epoxied them into 3 mm holes drilled into the 6 mm shaft, then epoxied the knurled stop ring on the end. The ring is curing in the bench block to stay perpendicular to the 6 mm shaft.

The spring constant is 55 g/mm and it’s now set for 125 g preload:

CNC 3018-Pro - Diamond bit - force measurement
CNC 3018-Pro – Diamond bit – force measurement

A quick test says all the parts have begun flying in formation:

CNC 3018-Pro - Diamond bit - test CD
CNC 3018-Pro – Diamond bit – test CD

It’s definitely more rigid than the MPCNC!

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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CNC 3018-Pro: Probe Camera Case for Anonymous USB Camera

The anonymous USB camera I used with the stereo zoom microscope not only works with VLC, but also with bCNC, and it has a round PCB with ears:

CNC 3018-Pro - Probe Camera - PCB
CNC 3018-Pro – Probe Camera – PCB

Which suggested putting it in a ball mount for E-Z aiming:

CNC 3018-Pro - Probe Camera - ball mount
CNC 3018-Pro – Probe Camera – ball mount

Black filament snippets serve as alignment pins to hold the ball halves together while they’re getting clamped. They’re epoxied into the upper half of the ball, because who knows when I’ll need to harvest the camera.

The clamp mount descends from the Tour Easy Daytime Running Lights, with more screws and less fancy shaping:

USB Camera - Round PCB Mount - solid model - build
USB Camera – Round PCB Mount – solid model – build

The clamp pieces fit around the ball with four M3 screws providing the clamping force:

USB Camera - Round PCB Mount - solid model sectioned
USB Camera – Round PCB Mount – solid model sectioned

The whole affair sticks onto the Z axis carrier with double-sided foam tape:

CNC 3018-Pro - Probe Camera - alignment
CNC 3018-Pro – Probe Camera – alignment

It barely clears the strut on the -X side of the carriage, although it does stick out over the edge of the chassis.

After the fact, I tucked a closed-cell foam ring between the lens threads and the ball housing to stabilize the lens; the original camera glued the thing in place, but some fiddly alignment & focusing lies ahead:

Alignment mirror - collimation
Alignment mirror – collimation

It’s worth noting that the optical axis of these cheap cameras rarely coincides with the physical central axis of the lens. This one requires a jaunty tilt, although it’s not noticeable in any of the pictures I tried to take.

All in all, this one works just like the probe camera on the MPCNC.

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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CNC 3018-Pro: Probe Camera Case for Logitch QuickCam Pro 5000

The ball-shaped Logitch QuickCam Pro 5000 has a rectangular PCB, so conjuring a case wasn’t too challenging:

Probe Camera Case - Logitech QuickCam Pro 5000 - bottom
Probe Camera Case – Logitech QuickCam Pro 5000 – bottom

That’s more-or-less matte black duct tape to cut down reflections.

The top side has a cover made from scuffed acrylic scrap:

Probe Camera Case - Logitech QuickCam Pro 5000 - top
Probe Camera Case – Logitech QuickCam Pro 5000 – top

The corners are slightly rounded to fit under the screw heads holding it in place.

The solid model shows off the internal ledge positioning the PCB so the camera lens housing rests on the floor:

3018 Probe Camera Mount - solid model
3018 Probe Camera Mount – solid model

The notch lets the cable out, while keeping it in one place and providing some strain relief.

I though if a camera was recognized by V4L2 and worked with VLC, it was good to go:

Logitech QuickCam Pro 5000 - short focus
Logitech QuickCam Pro 5000 – short focus

Regrettably, it turns out the camera has a pixel format incompatible with the Python opencv interface used by bCNC. This may have something to do with running the code on a Raspberry Pi, rather than an x86 box.

The camera will surely come in handy for something else, especially with such a cute case.

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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CNC 3018-Pro: Platter Fixtures

Up to this point, the Sherline has been drilling 3.5 inch hard drive platters to serve as as reflecting bases for the vacuum tubes:

LinuxCNC - Sherline Mill - Logitech Gamepad
LinuxCNC – Sherline Mill – Logitech Gamepad

The CNC 3018-Pro has a work envelope large enough for CD / DVD platters, so I mashed the Sherline fixture with dimensions from the vacuum tube code, added the 3018’s T-slot spacing, and conjured a pair of fixtures for a pair of machines.

Because I expect to practice on scrap CDs and DVDs for a while:

Platter Fixtures - CD on 3018
Platter Fixtures – CD on 3018

And a 3.5 inch hard drive platter version:

Platter Fixtures - hard drive platter on 3018
Platter Fixtures – hard drive platter on 3018

The holes sit at half the 3018’s T-slot spacing (45 mm / 2), so you can nudge the fixtures to the front or rear, as you prefer.

The alignment dots & slots should help touch off the XY coordinate system on the Sherline, although it can’t reach all of a CD. Using bCNC’s video alignment on the hub hole will be much easier on the 3018.

After fiddling around with the 3018 for a while, however, the CD fixture doesn’t have many advantages over simply taping the disc to a flat platen. Obviously, you’d want a sacrificial layer for drilling, but it’s not clear the OEM motor / ER11 chuck would be up to that task.

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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Tour Easy: Ruggedized Zzipper Fairing Mount

After nigh onto 18 years, the pipe straps holding the Zzipper fairing struts to the handlebars of our Tour Easy recumbents finally shrugged off their plastic wraps:

Tour Easy Zzipper Fairing - OEM mount
Tour Easy Zzipper Fairing – OEM mount

Although they still worked, riding over broken pavement produced distinct rattles; alas, the roads around here feature plenty of broken pavement.

The solution is a rugged plastic block capped with aluminum plates to spread the clamping load:

Tour Easy Zzipper Fairing - block mount
Tour Easy Zzipper Fairing – block mount

The solid model is straightforward:

Zzipper Fairing - Strut Mount - solid model - Show view
Zzipper Fairing – Strut Mount – solid model – Show view

A slight bit of tinkering made the stack exactly the right height for 45 mm screws secured with nyloc nuts. No washers on either end, although that’s definitely in the nature of fine tuning.

The three sections print without support:

Zzipper Fairing - Strut Mount - solid model
Zzipper Fairing – Strut Mount – solid model

I reamed the smaller hole with a 3/8 inch drill to match the fairing strut rod. The as-printed larger hole fit the handlebar perfectly, although the first picture shows the tubing isn’t exactly round on the near side of the block, where it starts the outward bend toward the grips.

The cap plates cried out for CNC, but I simply traced two outlines of the block on 1/8 inch aluminum sheet, bandsawed near the line, introduced them to Mr Disk Sander for finishing & corner rounding, transfer-punched the holes from the plastic blocks, and drilled to suit:

Tour Easy Zzipper Fairing - clamp plates
Tour Easy Zzipper Fairing – clamp plates

Making two pairs of plates by hand counts as Quality Shop Time around here.

The first few rides confirm the fix: no rattles!

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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Step2 Garden Seat: Replacement Seat

A pair of Step2 rolling garden seats (they have a new version) served in Mary’s gardens long enough to give their seat panels precarious cracks:

Step2 Seat - OEM seat
Step2 Seat – OEM seat

The underside was giving way, too:

Step2 Seat - cracks
Step2 Seat – cracks

We agreed the new seat could be much simpler, although it must still hinge upward, so I conjured a pair of hinges from the vasty digital deep:

Rolling Cart Hinges - solid model - bottom
Rolling Cart Hinges – solid model – bottom

The woodpile disgorged a slab of 1/4 inch = 6 mm plywood (used in a defunct project) of just about the right size and we agreed a few holes wouldn’t be a problem for its projected ahem use case:

Step2 Seat - assembled
Step2 Seat – assembled

The screw holes on the hinge tops will let me run machine screws all the way through, should that be necessary. So far, a quartet of self-tapping sheet metal (!) screws are holding firm.

Rolling Cart Hinges - solid model - top
Rolling Cart Hinges – solid model – top

A closer look at the hinges in real life:

Step2 Seat - top view
Step2 Seat – top view

The solid model now caps the holes; I can drill them out should the need arise.

From the bottom:

Step2 Seat - bottom view
Step2 Seat – bottom view

Three coats of white exterior paint make it blindingly bright in the sun, although we expect a week or two in the garden will knock the shine right off:

Step2 Seat - painted
Step2 Seat – painted

After the first coat, I conjured a drying rack from a bamboo skewer, a cardboard flap, and some hot-melt glue:

Step2 Seat - drying fixture
Step2 Seat – drying fixture

Three small scars on the seat bottom were deemed acceptable.

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

This original doodle gives the key dimensions, apart from the rounded rear edge required so the seat can pivot vertically upward:

Cart Hinge - dimension doodle
Cart Hinge – dimension doodle

The second seat looks just like this one, so life is good …

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