Posts Tagged M2

CNC 3018-Pro: Collet Pen Holder

Along the same lines as the MPCNC pen holder, I now have one for the 3018:

CNC3018 - Collet pen holder - assembled
CNC3018 – Collet pen holder – assembled

The body happened to be slightly longer than two LM12UU linear bearings stacked end-to-end, which I didn’t realize must be a constraint until I was pressing them into place:

CNC 3018-Pro Collet Holder - LM12UU - solid model
CNC 3018-Pro Collet Holder – LM12UU – solid model

In the unlikely event I need another one, the code will sprout a max() function in the appropriate spot.

Drilling the aluminum rod for the knurled ring produced a really nice chip:

CNC3018 - Collet pen holder - drilling knurled ring
CNC3018 – Collet pen holder – drilling knurled ring

Yeah, a good drill will produce two chips, but I’ll take what I can get.

There’s not much left of the original holder after turning it down to 8 mm so it fits inside the 12 mm rod:

CNC3018 - Collet pen holder - turning collet OD
CNC3018 – Collet pen holder – turning collet OD

Confronted by so much shiny aluminum, I realized I didn’t need an 8 mm hole through the rod, so I cut off the collet shaft and drilled out the back end to clear the flanges on the ink tubes:

CNC3018 - Collet pen holder - drilling out collet
CNC3018 – Collet pen holder – drilling out collet

I figured things would eventually go badly if I trimmed enough ink-filled crimps:

Collet holder - pen cartridge locating flanges
Collet holder – pen cartridge locating flanges

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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Makergear M2: Octopi Camera Mount

Octopirint / Octopi works wonderfully well as a controller / G-Code feeder for my Makergear M2. After putting up with an ungainly mass of tape for far too long, I printed Toddman’s Pi Camera Mount:

Pi Camera - M2 Mount - Slic3r
Pi Camera – M2 Mount – Slic3r

Which snapped together exactly like it should:

Makergear M2 - Pi Camera Mount
Makergear M2 – Pi Camera Mount

A strip of double-sided foam tape attaches it to the Pi’s case, which is Velcro-ed to the M2’s frame. The cable may be too long, but avoids sharp bends on the way out of the case.

The whole lashup works fine:

Pi Camera - M2 Mount - Octopi timelapse
Pi Camera – M2 Mount – Octopi timelapse

That’s a second set intended for the CNC 3018-Pro, but it didn’t fit quite as well. The B brackets are slightly too long (or their pivots are slightly too close to their base) to allow the C plates to turn 90° to the mount:

Pi Camera - M2 Mount - Config 2 diagram
Pi Camera – M2 Mount – Config 2 diagram

Nothing one can’t fix with nibbling & filing, but I long for parametric designs …

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CNC 3018-Pro: Hard Drive Platter Fixture

A variation on the CD fixture produces a 3.5 inch hard drive platter fixture:

Platter Fixtures - Hard Drive on 3018
Platter Fixtures – Hard Drive on 3018

Which needed just a touch of milling for a snug fit around the platter:

CNC 3018-Pro - HD platter fixture - test fit
CNC 3018-Pro – HD platter fixture – test fit

Tape it down on the 3018’s platform, set XY=0 at the center, and It Just Works™:

CNC 3018-Pro - HD platter fixture - 70 g
CNC 3018-Pro – HD platter fixture – 70 g

The rather faint line shows engraving at -1.0 mm = 70 g downforce isn’t quite enough. Another test with the same pattern at -3.0 mm = 140 g came out better:

CNC 3018-Pro - HD platter fixture - 140 g
CNC 3018-Pro – HD platter fixture – 140 g

It’s in the same OpenSCAD file as the CD fixture, in the unlikely event you need one.

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CNC 3018-Pro: Tape-Down Platter Fixture

Diamond drag engraving doesn’t put much sideways force on the platters, so taping the CD in place suffices to hold it:

CNC 3018-Pro - CD taped to platform
CNC 3018-Pro – CD taped to platform

Wrapping a flange around the screw-down platter fixture provides plenty of surface area for tape:

Platter Fixtures - CD on 3018 - tape flange
Platter Fixtures – CD on 3018 – tape flange

Which looks exactly as you think it would in real life:

CNC 3018-Pro - CD fixture - taped
CNC 3018-Pro – CD fixture – taped

Admittedly, masking tape doesn’t look professional, but it’s low-profile, cheap and works perfectly. Blue painter’s tape for the “permanent” hold-down strips on the platform would be a colorful upgrade.

It’s centered on the platform at the XY=0 origin in the middle of the XY travel limits, with edges aligned parallel to the axes. Homing the 3018 and moving to XY=0 puts the tool point directly over the center of the CD without any fussy alignment.

The blue-and-red rings around the center hole assist probe camera alignment, whenever that’s necessary.

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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CNC 3018-Pro: LM6UU Linear-bearing Diamond Drag Bit Holder

The CNC 3018-Pro normally holds a small DC motor with a nicely cylindrical housing,so this was an easy adaptation of the MPCNC’s diamond drag bit holder:

CNC 3018-Pro - Diamond bit - overview
CNC 3018-Pro – Diamond bit – overview

The lip around the bottom part rests atop the tool clamp, with the spring reaction plate sized to clear the notch in the Z-axis stage.

The solid model looks about like you’d expect:

Diamond Scribe - Mount - solid model
Diamond Scribe – Mount – solid model

The New Thing compared to the MPCNC holder is wrapping LM6UU bearings around an actual 6 mm shaft, instead of using LM3UU bearings for the crappy diamond bit shank:

CNC 3018-Pro - Diamond bit - epoxy curing
CNC 3018-Pro – Diamond bit – epoxy curing

I cut the shank in two pieces, epoxied them into 3 mm holes drilled into the 6 mm shaft, then epoxied the knurled stop ring on the end. The ring is curing in the bench block to stay perpendicular to the 6 mm shaft.

The spring constant is 55 g/mm and it’s now set for 125 g preload:

CNC 3018-Pro - Diamond bit - force measurement
CNC 3018-Pro – Diamond bit – force measurement

A quick test says all the parts have begun flying in formation:

CNC 3018-Pro - Diamond bit - test CD
CNC 3018-Pro – Diamond bit – test CD

It’s definitely more rigid than the MPCNC!

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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CNC 3018-Pro: Probe Camera Case for Anonymous USB Camera

The anonymous USB camera I used with the stereo zoom microscope not only works with VLC, but also with bCNC, and it has a round PCB with ears:

CNC 3018-Pro - Probe Camera - PCB
CNC 3018-Pro – Probe Camera – PCB

Which suggested putting it in a ball mount for E-Z aiming:

CNC 3018-Pro - Probe Camera - ball mount
CNC 3018-Pro – Probe Camera – ball mount

Black filament snippets serve as alignment pins to hold the ball halves together while they’re getting clamped. They’re epoxied into the upper half of the ball, because who knows when I’ll need to harvest the camera.

The clamp mount descends from the Tour Easy Daytime Running Lights, with more screws and less fancy shaping:

USB Camera - Round PCB Mount - solid model - build
USB Camera – Round PCB Mount – solid model – build

The clamp pieces fit around the ball with four M3 screws providing the clamping force:

USB Camera - Round PCB Mount - solid model sectioned
USB Camera – Round PCB Mount – solid model sectioned

The whole affair sticks onto the Z axis carrier with double-sided foam tape:

CNC 3018-Pro - Probe Camera - alignment
CNC 3018-Pro – Probe Camera – alignment

It barely clears the strut on the -X side of the carriage, although it does stick out over the edge of the chassis.

After the fact, I tucked a closed-cell foam ring between the lens threads and the ball housing to stabilize the lens; the original camera glued the thing in place, but some fiddly alignment & focusing lies ahead:

Alignment mirror - collimation
Alignment mirror – collimation

It’s worth noting that the optical axis of these cheap cameras rarely coincides with the physical central axis of the lens. This one requires a jaunty tilt, although it’s not noticeable in any of the pictures I tried to take.

All in all, this one works just like the probe camera on the MPCNC.

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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CNC 3018-Pro: Probe Camera Case for Logitch QuickCam Pro 5000

The ball-shaped Logitch QuickCam Pro 5000 has a rectangular PCB, so conjuring a case wasn’t too challenging:

Probe Camera Case - Logitech QuickCam Pro 5000 - bottom
Probe Camera Case – Logitech QuickCam Pro 5000 – bottom

That’s more-or-less matte black duct tape to cut down reflections.

The top side has a cover made from scuffed acrylic scrap:

Probe Camera Case - Logitech QuickCam Pro 5000 - top
Probe Camera Case – Logitech QuickCam Pro 5000 – top

The corners are slightly rounded to fit under the screw heads holding it in place.

The solid model shows off the internal ledge positioning the PCB so the camera lens housing rests on the floor:

3018 Probe Camera Mount - solid model
3018 Probe Camera Mount – solid model

The notch lets the cable out, while keeping it in one place and providing some strain relief.

I though if a camera was recognized by V4L2 and worked with VLC, it was good to go:

Logitech QuickCam Pro 5000 - short focus
Logitech QuickCam Pro 5000 – short focus

Regrettably, it turns out the camera has a pixel format incompatible with the Python opencv interface used by bCNC. This may have something to do with running the code on a Raspberry Pi, rather than an x86 box.

The camera will surely come in handy for something else, especially with such a cute case.

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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