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Posts Tagged MPCNC

MPCNC Drag Knife: Ground Shaft in LM12UU Bearing

The 12 mm drag knife holder on the left slides nicely in an LM12UU bearing:

Drag Knife holders - detail
Drag Knife holders – detail

However, its aluminum body isn’t really intended as a bearing surface and it extends only halfway through the LM12UU, so I finally got around to modifying the 11.5 mm body on the right to fit into a section of 12 mm ground shaft:

Drag Knife - turning 11.5 mm body to 10 mm
Drag Knife – turning 11.5 mm body to 10 mm

The general idea is to turn the body down to 10 mm OD; the picture shows the first pass over the nose after turning the far end down and removing the flange in the process. Exact concentricity of both ends isn’t important (it gets epoxied into a 10 mm hole through the 12 mm ground shaft), but it came out rather pretty:

Drag Knife - 11.5 mm body - turned to 10 mm
Drag Knife – 11.5 mm body – turned to 10 mm

The ground shaft started as a pen holder:

DW660 Pen Holder - ground shaft
DW660 Pen Holder – ground shaft

I knocked off the ring and bored the interior to fit the 10 mm knife body. The large end of the existing bore came from a 25/64 inch = 9.92 mm drill, so it was just shy of 10.0 mm, and I drilled the small end upward from 0.33 inch = 8.4 mm.

The smallest trio of a new set of cheap carbide boring bars allegedly went into a 5/16 inch = 7.9 mm bore, but I had to file the bar body down and diamond-file more end relief into the carbide for clearance inside the drilled hole:

Modified boring bar vs original
Modified boring bar vs original

I blued the bit, kissed it against the drilled bore, filed off whatever wasn’t blued, and iterated until the carbide edge started cutting. Sissy cuts all the way, with no pix to show for all the flailing around.

Epoxying the turned-down drag knife body into the shaft: anticlimactic.

The solid model features a stylin’ tapered snout:

Drag Knife LM12UU holder - tapered end
Drag Knife LM12UU holder – tapered end

Which gets an LM12UU bearing rammed into place:

Drag Knife - LM12UU holder - inserting bearing
Drag Knife – LM12UU holder – inserting bearing

The steel block leaves the bearing flush with the plastic surface, rather than having it continue onward and indent itself into the wood; I can learn from my mistakes.

The new idea: a single spring pressing the knife holder downward, reacting against a fixed plastic plate:

Drag Knife - LM12UU ground shaft - assembled
Drag Knife – LM12UU ground shaft – assembled

Unlike the previous design, the upper plate doesn’t move, so there’s no problem caused by sliding along the screw threads. I should run nylock nuts up against the plate to keep it in place, stiffen the structure, and provide some friction to keep the screws from loosening.

The top of the knife holder now has a boss anchoring the spring:

Drag Knife - turning spring recess
Drag Knife – turning spring recess

As you’d expect, the ground shaft slides wonderfully in the bearing, because that’s what it’s designed to do, and the knife has essentially zero stiction and friction at any point along the bearing, which is exactly what I wanted.

The spring, from the same assortment as all the others, has a 48 g/mm rate.

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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MPCNC Diamond Engraver: LM3UU Bearings, First Pass

Gripping a diamond engraver in a collet chuck worked well enough, but the MPCNC’s pen holder lacks sufficient downforce and lateral stiffness. The bit has a chrome-ish plated 3 mm shank, so I tinkered up a mount for a pair of LM3UU linear bearings from the LM12UU drag knife holder:

Diamond Scribe - LM3UU - Rev 1 - point view
Diamond Scribe – LM3UU – Rev 1 – point view

The shank isn’t exactly a precision part, but a few licks with a diamond file knocked off enough of the high spots so it slides reasonably well through the bearings. The bearing alignment is more critical than a simple 3D printed plastic part can provide, so a real version may need bearings in a metal shaft press-fit into the plastic; brute-forcing the bearings into alignment sufficed for now.

The butt end of the shank press-fits into a disk held down with three springs, similar to the LM12UU mount:

Diamond Scribe - LM3UU - Rev 1 - top view
Diamond Scribe – LM3UU – Rev 1 – top view

It draws Guilloché patterns just fine:

Diamond Scribe - LM3UU - Rev 1 - first light
Diamond Scribe – LM3UU – Rev 1 – first light

I don’t like how the spring-around-screw motion works, even if it’s OK for small excursions.

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MPCNC Drag Knife: LM12UU Linear Bearing

The anodized body of the drag knife on the left measures exactly 12.0 mm OD:

Drag Knife holders - detail
Drag Knife holders – detail

Which happy fact suggested I might be able to use a standard LM12UU linear bearing, despite the obvious stupidity of running an aluminum “shaft” in a steel-ball bearing race:

Drag Knife - LM12UU holder - solid model
Drag Knife – LM12UU holder – solid model

The 12 mm section extends about halfway through the bearing, with barely 3 mm extending out the far end:

Drag Knife - LM12UU - knife blade detail
Drag Knife – LM12UU – knife blade detail

Because the knife body isn’t touching the bearing for the lower half of its length, it’ll probably deflect too much in the XY plane, but it’s simple enough to try out.

As before, the knife body’s flange is a snug fit in the hole bored in the upper disk:

Drag Knife - spring plate test fit
Drag Knife – spring plate test fit

This time, I tried faking stripper bolts by filling the threads of ordinary socket head cap screws with epoxy:

Ersatz stripper bolts - epoxy fill
Ersatz stripper bolts – epoxy fill

Turning the filled section to match the thread OD showed this just wasn’t going to work at all, so I turned the gunked section of the threads down to about 3.5 mm and continued the mission:

Drag Knife - LM12UU holder - assembled
Drag Knife – LM12UU holder – assembled

Next time, I’ll try mounting the disk on telescoping brass tubing nested around the screws. The motivation for the epoxy nonsense came from the discovery that real stainless steel stripper bolts run five bucks each, which means I’m just not stocking up on the things.

It slide surprisingly well on the cut-down screws, though:

Drag Knife - applique templates
Drag Knife – applique templates

Those appliqué templates came from patterns for a block in one of Mary’s current quilting projects, so perhaps I can be of some use whenever she next needs intricate cutouts.

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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MPCNC Drag Knife: PETG Linear Bearing

Having reasonable success using a 12 mm hole bored in a 3D printed mount for the nice drag knife holder on the left, I thought I’d try the same trick for the raw aluminum holder on the right side:

Drag Knife holders - detail
Drag Knife holders – detail

The 11.5 mm body is long enough to justify making a longer holder with more bearing surface:

Drag Knife Holder - 11.5 mm body - Slic3r preview
Drag Knife Holder – 11.5 mm body – Slic3r preview

Slicing with four perimeter threads lays down enough reasonably solid plastic to bore the central hole to a nice sliding fit:

Drag Knife - 11.5 mm body - boring
Drag Knife – 11.5 mm body – boring

The top disk gets bored to a snug press fit around the flange and upper body:

Drag Knife - 11.5 mm body - flange boring
Drag Knife – 11.5 mm body – flange boring

Assemble with springs and it pretty much works:

Drag Knife - hexagon depth setting
Drag Knife – hexagon depth setting

Unfortunately, it doesn’t work particularly well, because the two screws tightening the MPCNC’s DW660 tool holder (the black band) can apply enough force to deform the PETG mount and lock the drag knife body in the bore, while not being quite tight enough to prevent the mount from moving.

I think the holder for the black knife (on the left) worked better, because:

  • The anodized surface is much smoother & slipperier
  • The body is shorter, so less friction

In any event, I reached a sufficiently happy compromise for some heavy paper / light cardboard test shapes, but a PETG bearing won’t suffice for dependable drag knife cuttery.

Back to the laboratory …

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Engraving Guilloché Patterns

Flushed with success from engraving a hard drive platter for the 21HB5A tube, I bandsawed an acrylic square from a scrap sheet and unleashed the diamond drag bit on it:

Guilloche 540237875 - engraved at -0.50mm
Guilloche 540237875 – engraved at -0.50mm

That’s side-lit against a dark blue background. The long scratch and assorted dirt come from its protracted stay in the scrap pile.

If you look closely, you’ll see a few slightly wider loops, which came from a false start at Z=-0.1 mm.

Engraving at -0.5 mm looked pretty good:

Guilloche 540237875 - engraved at -0.50mm - detail
Guilloche 540237875 – engraved at -0.50mm – detail

Despite an angular resolution of 2°, the curves came out entirely smooth enough. The gritty scratchiness resulted in a pile of chaff covering the engraved area; perhaps some oil or lube or whatever would help.

Rescaling the pattern to fit a CD platter worked fine, too:

Guilloche 540237875 - CD engraving
Guilloche 540237875 – CD engraving

Polycarbonate seems to deform slightly, rather than scratch, leaving the final product with no chaff at all:

In this case, the doubled lines come from the reflection off the aluminized lower surface holding all the data.

That CD should be unreadable by now …

[Update: Welcome, Adafruit! More on Guilloché pattern generation and engraving them with the MPCNC. ]

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Collet Pen Holder vs. Cheap Refills

The three collet pen holders I got a while ago came with ink cartridges:

Collet pen holder
Collet pen holder

So I bought three bucks worth of a dozen pens to get pretty colors, whereupon I discovered they didn’t fit into the collet. Turns out the locating flanges aren’t in the same place along the cartridges:

The flanges on the top cartridge have been shaved down perilously close to the ink, but it now fits into the collet.

Bonus: a dozen fairly stiff springs that are sure to come in handy for something!

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MPCNC: Guilloche Engraving First Light

A diamond point drag engraving bit in the MPCNC scratched a suitable Guilloché pattern into a scrap hard drive platter much much better than I had any reason to expect:

MPCNC - Guilloche 835242896 - HD plattter - 0.1mm

MPCNC – Guilloche 835242896 – HD plattter – 0.1mm

That’s with a 0.1 mm cut depth, sidelit with an LED flashlight.

Feeding those nine digits into the Guilloché pattern generator script should get you the same pattern; set the paper size to 109 mm and use Pen=0 to suppress the legend.

The same pattern at 0.3 mm cut depth looks about the same:

MPCNC - Guilloche 835242896 - HD plattter - 0.3mm

MPCNC – Guilloche 835242896 – HD plattter – 0.3mm

It’s slightly more prominent in real life, but not by enough to make a big difference. I should try a graduated series of tests, of course, which will require harvesting a few more platters from dead drives.

Either side will look great under a 21HB5A tube, although the disks are fingerprint and dust magnets beyond compare.

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