Advertisements

3D Printed Things I’ve Designed: Brag Sheets

The whole reason I got a 3D printer in the first place was to make things that would otherwise be too difficult or tedious by hand or on a CNC mill. Most of the things I make look like brackets and I don’t do sculptures … this stuff solves problems!

Being able to go from “I need a part shaped like that” to holding the thing in my hand a few hours (or, for complex designs, days) later is empowering. Being able to adjust a dimension by changing the source code and “recompiling” to get a new part is wonderful.

These five slides from the presentation show my answers to the question “Why would anyone want a 3D printer?” Clicky for more dots.

Things I Designed - 1

Things I Designed – 1

Things I Designed - 2

Things I Designed – 2

Things I Designed - 3

Things I Designed – 3

Things I Designed - 4

Things I Designed – 4

Things I Designed - 5

Things I Designed – 5

You can find those and more by searching for OpenSCAD source code.

They go along with the sheets of solid models.

Advertisements

, ,

  1. #1 by MS3FGX on 2014-05-13 - 20:38

    For what it’s worth, I’ve been following your blog for quite some time, and the projects you’ve posted in relation to your 3D printing have gone a long way towards me finally getting my own printer.

    When talking to people about 3D printing, the “What would you do with it?” question comes up a lot, and it’s kind of hard to answer. Most people think you need to have an idea in mind before you buy the printer, but in reality, I think the opposite is a better use case. Your blog is an excellent example of that.

    If the idea of having a machine that can literally turn your ideas into reality is something that excites you, then a 3D printer is probably a good buy. If you don’t get it, then this may not be the technology for you (at least, not yet).

    • #2 by Ed on 2014-05-13 - 20:59

      having a machine that can literally turn your ideas into reality

      Right there, you’ve got the spirit of the thing!

      For most of the gadgets I build, a plastic part is exactly what I need. If you need metal, you can iterate on a design until it’s the right shape & size, then send the STL to Shapeways (et al) and get the same thing back in metal.

      It’s the easiest way I’ve ever seen to go from “I need something like this” to holding it in my hand. Very empowering, indeed.

      (OK, there’s a bunch of hassle with having your own 3D printer, but when it works, it’s wonderful.)

      the “What would you do with it?” question comes up a lot, and it’s kind of hard to answer.

      If you already make things, you know the answer. Someone who doesn’t make things can’t understand the answer.

      FWIW, I think the “Let’s print somebody else’s design!” market will flame out fairly quickly.

      Welcome aboard!