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Search Results for: "openscad source code"

CNC 3018-Pro: Home Switches

The CNC 3018-Pro doesn’t absolutely need home switches, but (in principle) they let you install a workholding fixture at a known position, home the axes, pick a preset coordinate system for the fixture, and not have to touch off the axes before making parts.

Having used Makerbot-style endstop switch PCBs for the MPCNC, this was straightforward:

3018 CNC - Endstop switches - overview
3018 CNC – Endstop switches – overview

The X and Z axis switches simply press against the appropriate moving parts:

3018 CNC - X and Z Endstops
3018 CNC – X and Z Endstops

The little tab stuck on the tool clamp provides a bit of clearance around the upper part of the X axis assembly.

The Y axis switch needed a slightly tapered tab to extend the bearing holder:

3018 CNC - Y axis endstop
3018 CNC – Y axis endstop

It’s made from a random scrap of clear plastic, hand-filed to suit, and stuck on the bearing to trigger the switch in exactly the right spot.

You can find elaborate switch mounts on Thingiverse, but I’ve become a big fan of genuine 3M outdoor-rated foam tape for this sort of thing: aggressive stickiness, no deterioration, possible-but-not-easy removal.

The switches need +5 V power, so add a small hack to the CAMTool V3.3 control board to let the connectors plug right in:

3018 CNC CAMTool - Endstop power mod - installed
3018 CNC CAMTool – Endstop power mod – installed

The solid models borrow their central depression around the switch terminals from the MPCNC blocks:

3018 Home Switch Mounts - Slic3r preview
3018 Home Switch Mounts – Slic3r preview

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

The dimension doodles:

3018 Home Switch Mounts - Dimension Doodles
3018 Home Switch Mounts – Dimension Doodles
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Step2 Garden Seat: Replacement Seat

A pair of Step2 rolling garden seats (they have a new version) served in Mary’s gardens long enough to give their seat panels precarious cracks:

Step2 Seat - OEM seat
Step2 Seat – OEM seat

The underside was giving way, too:

Step2 Seat - cracks
Step2 Seat – cracks

We agreed the new seat could be much simpler, although it must still hinge upward, so I conjured a pair of hinges from the vasty digital deep:

Rolling Cart Hinges - solid model - bottom
Rolling Cart Hinges – solid model – bottom

The woodpile disgorged a slab of 1/4 inch = 6 mm plywood (used in a defunct project) of just about the right size and we agreed a few holes wouldn’t be a problem for its projected ahem use case:

Step2 Seat - assembled
Step2 Seat – assembled

The screw holes on the hinge tops will let me run machine screws all the way through, should that be necessary. So far, a quartet of self-tapping sheet metal (!) screws are holding firm.

Rolling Cart Hinges - solid model - top
Rolling Cart Hinges – solid model – top

A closer look at the hinges in real life:

Step2 Seat - top view
Step2 Seat – top view

The solid model now caps the holes; I can drill them out should the need arise.

From the bottom:

Step2 Seat - bottom view
Step2 Seat – bottom view

Three coats of white exterior paint make it blindingly bright in the sun, although we expect a week or two in the garden will knock the shine right off:

Step2 Seat - painted
Step2 Seat – painted

After the first coat, I conjured a drying rack from a bamboo skewer, a cardboard flap, and some hot-melt glue:

Step2 Seat - drying fixture
Step2 Seat – drying fixture

Three small scars on the seat bottom were deemed acceptable.

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

This original doodle gives the key dimensions, apart from the rounded rear edge required so the seat can pivot vertically upward:

Cart Hinge - dimension doodle
Cart Hinge – dimension doodle

The second seat looks just like this one, so life is good …

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MPCNC Collet Pen Holder: LM12UU Edition

Encouraged by the smooth running of the LM12UU drag knife mount, I chopped off another length of 12 mm shaft:

LM12UU Collet Pen Holder - sawing shaft
LM12UU Collet Pen Holder – sawing shaft

The MicroMark Cut-off saw was barely up to the task; I must do something about its craptastic “vise”. In any event, the wet rags kept the shaft plenty cool and the ShopVac hose directly behind the motor sucked away all of the flying grit.

The reason I used an abrasive wheel: the shaft is case-hardened and the outer millimeter or two is hard enough to repel a carbide cutter:

LM12UU Collet Pen Holder - drilling shaft
LM12UU Collet Pen Holder – drilling shaft

Fortunately, the middle remains soft enough to drill a hole for the collet pen holder, which I turned down to a uniform 8 mm (-ish) diameter:

LM12UU Collet Pen Holder - turning collet body
LM12UU Collet Pen Holder – turning collet body

Slather JB Kwik epoxy along the threads, insert into the shaft, wipe off the excess, and looks almost like a Real Product:

LM12UU Collet Pen Holder - finished body
LM12UU Collet Pen Holder – finished body

The far end of the shaft recesses the collet a few millimeters to retain the spring around the pen body, which will also require a knurled ring around the outside so you (well, I) can tighten the collet around the pen tip.

Start the ring by center-drilling an absurdly long aluminum rod in the steady rest:

M12UU Collet Pen Holder - center drilling
M12UU Collet Pen Holder – center drilling

Although it’s not obvious, I cleaned up the OD before applying the knurling tool:

LM12UU Collet Pen Holder - knurling
LM12UU Collet Pen Holder – knurling

For some unknown reason, it seemed like a Good Idea to knurl without the steady rest, perhaps to avoid deepening the ring where the jaws slide, but Tiny Lathe™ definitely wasn’t up to the challenge. The knurling wheels aren’t quite concentric on their bores and their shafts have plenty of play, so I got to watch the big live center and tailstock wobbulate as the rod turned.

With the steady rest back in place, drill out the rod to match the shaft’s 12 mm OD:

LM12UU Collet Pen Holder - drilling shaft
LM12UU Collet Pen Holder – drilling shaft

All my “metric” drilling uses hard-inch drills approximating the metric dimensions, of course, because USA.

Clean up the ring face, file a chamfer on the edge, and part it off:

LM12UU Collet Pen Holder - parting ring
LM12UU Collet Pen Holder – parting ring

Turn some PVC pipe to a suitable length, slit one side so it can collapse to match the ring OD, wrap shimstock to protect those lovely knurls, and face off all the ugly:

LM12UU Collet Pen Holder - knurled ring facing
LM12UU Collet Pen Holder – knurled ring facing

Tweak the drag knife’s solid model for a different spring from the collection and up the hole OD in the plate to clear the largest pen cartridge in the current collection:

Collet Holder - LM12UU - solid model
Collet Holder – LM12UU – solid model

Convince all the parts to fly in formation, then measure the spring rate:

LM12UU Collet Pen Holder - spring rate test
LM12UU Collet Pen Holder – spring rate test

Which works out to be 128 g + 54 g/mm:

LM12UU Collet Pen Holder - test plot - overview
LM12UU Collet Pen Holder – test plot – overview

I forgot the knurled ring must clear the screws and, ideally, the nyloc nuts. Which it does, after I carefully aligned each nut with a flat exactly tangent to the ring. Whew!

A closer look at the business end:

LM12UU Collet Pen Holder - test plot - detail
LM12UU Collet Pen Holder – test plot – detail

The shaft has 5 mm of travel, far more than enough for the MPCNC’s platform. Plotting at -1 mm applies 180 g of downforce; the test pattern shown above varies the depth from 0.0 mm in steps of -0.1 mm; anything beyond -0.2 mm gets plenty of ink.

Now I have a pen holder, a diamond scribe, and a drag knife with (almost) exactly the same “tool offset” from the alignment camera, thereby eliminating an opportunity to screw up.

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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MPCNC Diamond Engraver: LM3UU Bearings, Second Pass

Having a single spring and a fixed upper plate works much better than the first version:

Diamond Scribe - LM3UU Rev 2 - overview
Diamond Scribe – LM3UU Rev 2 – overview

The (lubricated!) nyloc nuts under the plate provide a little friction and stabilize the whole affair.

The solid model has the same stylin’ tapered snout as the LM12UU drag knife mount:

Diamond Scribe - LM3UU bearings
Diamond Scribe – LM3UU bearings

The spring seats in the plate recess, with the 3 mm shank passing through the hole as the tool holder presses the tip against the workpiece.

I diamond-filed a broken carbide end mill to make a slotting tool:

Diamond Scribe - LM3UU - Rev 2 - carbide notch tool
Diamond Scribe – LM3UU – Rev 2 – carbide notch tool

Lacking any better method (“a tiny clip spreader tool”), I rammed the Jesus clip the length of the shank with a (loose-fitting) chuck in the tailstock:

Diamond Scribe - LM3UU - Rev 2 - clip installation
Diamond Scribe – LM3UU – Rev 2 – clip installation

Even without nyloc nuts, the first test worked fine:

Diamond Scribe - LM3UU - Rev 2 - first light
Diamond Scribe – LM3UU – Rev 2 – first light

The 53 g/mm spring rate may be too low for serious engraving, but it suffices for subtle Guilloché patterns on scrap platters.

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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Garden Soaker Hose Connector Repair

Two of Mary’s garden soaker hoses failed their pre-installation checks with leaks from around their connectors. The problem seemed to be a break in the hose inside the connector, with water spewing out of the connector around the hose. Having previously fixed a gash in another hose, I figured I might have some success at fixing these leaks.

The general idea is to squish enough silicone rubber inside the connector to seal around the hose, then clamp the hose and connector snugly enough to hold the rubber in place:

Soaker Hose Connector Clamp - Show view
Soaker Hose Connector Clamp – Show view

The enlarged recess fits around the brass connector shell, which is squashed loosely around the hose and from which the leaking water emerges. Of course, because this is a different hose, the previous model didn’t quite fit and I had to doodle up new geometry:

Soaker Hose Connector repair - Dimension doodle
Soaker Hose Connector repair – Dimension doodle

As before, I bandsawed aluminum backing plates to ensure the plastic didn’t get all bendy in the middle:

Soaker hose connector leak clamps
Soaker hose connector leak clamps

The hose clamp (!) around the connector on the far right ensures a split in the brass shell doesn’t get any larger.

They’ll spend the rest of their lives under the garden mulch, where nobody will ever see those bulky lumps. Life is good!

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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MPCNC Drag Knife: Ground Shaft in LM12UU Bearing

The 12 mm drag knife holder on the left slides nicely in an LM12UU bearing:

Drag Knife holders - detail
Drag Knife holders – detail

However, its aluminum body isn’t really intended as a bearing surface and it extends only halfway through the LM12UU, so I finally got around to modifying the 11.5 mm body on the right to fit into a section of 12 mm ground shaft:

Drag Knife - turning 11.5 mm body to 10 mm
Drag Knife – turning 11.5 mm body to 10 mm

The general idea is to turn the body down to 10 mm OD; the picture shows the first pass over the nose after turning the far end down and removing the flange in the process. Exact concentricity of both ends isn’t important (it gets epoxied into a 10 mm hole through the 12 mm ground shaft), but it came out rather pretty:

Drag Knife - 11.5 mm body - turned to 10 mm
Drag Knife – 11.5 mm body – turned to 10 mm

The ground shaft started as a pen holder:

DW660 Pen Holder - ground shaft
DW660 Pen Holder – ground shaft

I knocked off the ring and bored the interior to fit the 10 mm knife body. The large end of the existing bore came from a 25/64 inch = 9.92 mm drill, so it was just shy of 10.0 mm, and I drilled the small end upward from 0.33 inch = 8.4 mm.

The smallest trio of a new set of cheap carbide boring bars allegedly went into a 5/16 inch = 7.9 mm bore, but I had to file the bar body down and diamond-file more end relief into the carbide for clearance inside the drilled hole:

Modified boring bar vs original
Modified boring bar vs original

I blued the bit, kissed it against the drilled bore, filed off whatever wasn’t blued, and iterated until the carbide edge started cutting. Sissy cuts all the way, with no pix to show for all the flailing around.

Epoxying the turned-down drag knife body into the shaft: anticlimactic.

The solid model features a stylin’ tapered snout:

Drag Knife LM12UU holder - tapered end
Drag Knife LM12UU holder – tapered end

Which gets an LM12UU bearing rammed into place:

Drag Knife - LM12UU holder - inserting bearing
Drag Knife – LM12UU holder – inserting bearing

The steel block leaves the bearing flush with the plastic surface, rather than having it continue onward and indent itself into the wood; I can learn from my mistakes.

The new idea: a single spring pressing the knife holder downward, reacting against a fixed plastic plate:

Drag Knife - LM12UU ground shaft - assembled
Drag Knife – LM12UU ground shaft – assembled

Unlike the previous design, the upper plate doesn’t move, so there’s no problem caused by sliding along the screw threads. I should run nylock nuts up against the plate to keep it in place, stiffen the structure, and provide some friction to keep the screws from loosening.

The top of the knife holder now has a boss anchoring the spring:

Drag Knife - turning spring recess
Drag Knife – turning spring recess

As you’d expect, the ground shaft slides wonderfully in the bearing, because that’s what it’s designed to do, and the knife has essentially zero stiction and friction at any point along the bearing, which is exactly what I wanted.

The spring, from the same assortment as all the others, has a 48 g/mm rate.

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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MPCNC Drag Knife: LM12UU Linear Bearing

The anodized body of the drag knife on the left measures exactly 12.0 mm OD:

Drag Knife holders - detail
Drag Knife holders – detail

Which happy fact suggested I might be able to use a standard LM12UU linear bearing, despite the obvious stupidity of running an aluminum “shaft” in a steel-ball bearing race:

Drag Knife - LM12UU holder - solid model
Drag Knife – LM12UU holder – solid model

The 12 mm section extends about halfway through the bearing, with barely 3 mm extending out the far end:

Drag Knife - LM12UU - knife blade detail
Drag Knife – LM12UU – knife blade detail

Because the knife body isn’t touching the bearing for the lower half of its length, it’ll probably deflect too much in the XY plane, but it’s simple enough to try out.

As before, the knife body’s flange is a snug fit in the hole bored in the upper disk:

Drag Knife - spring plate test fit
Drag Knife – spring plate test fit

This time, I tried faking stripper bolts by filling the threads of ordinary socket head cap screws with epoxy:

Ersatz stripper bolts - epoxy fill
Ersatz stripper bolts – epoxy fill

Turning the filled section to match the thread OD showed this just wasn’t going to work at all, so I turned the gunked section of the threads down to about 3.5 mm and continued the mission:

Drag Knife - LM12UU holder - assembled
Drag Knife – LM12UU holder – assembled

Next time, I’ll try mounting the disk on telescoping brass tubing nested around the screws. The motivation for the epoxy nonsense came from the discovery that real stainless steel stripper bolts run five bucks each, which means I’m just not stocking up on the things.

It slide surprisingly well on the cut-down screws, though:

Drag Knife - applique templates
Drag Knife – applique templates

Those appliqué templates came from patterns for a block in one of Mary’s current quilting projects, so perhaps I can be of some use whenever she next needs intricate cutouts.

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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