Under-cabinet Lamp Brackets: Angled Edition

The LED strip lights have a reasonably diffuse pattern with an on-axis bright area that puts more light on the rear of the counter than seems strictly necessary. Revising the original brackets to tilt the strips moves the bright patch half a foot forward:

Kitchen Light Bracket - angled - solid model

Kitchen Light Bracket – angled – solid model

For lack of anything smarter, the angle puts the diagonal of the LED strip on the level:

Kitchen Light Bracket - angled - Slic3r preview

Kitchen Light Bracket – angled – Slic3r preview

The translucent block represents the strip (double-thick and double-wide), with a peg punching a hole for the threaded brass insert.

Although the source code has an option to splice the middle blocks together, it can also build them separately:

Kitchen Light Bracket - angled - LED block

Kitchen Light Bracket – angled – LED block

Turns out they’re easier to assemble that way; screw ’em to the strips, then screw the strips to the cabinet.

I moved the deck screw holes to the other end of the block, thus putting the strips against the inside of the cabinet face. It turns out the IR sensor responds to the DC level of the reflected light, not short-term changes, which meant the reflection from the adjacent wood blinded it to anything waved below. Adding a strip of black electrical tape killed enough of the reflected light to solve that problem:

 

Under-cabinet light - IR sensor shield

Under-cabinet light – IR sensor shield

The tape isn’t quite as far off-center as it looks, but I’m glad nobody will ever see it …

The before-and-after light patterns, as viewed on B-size metric graph paper centered on the left-hand strip and aligned with the belly side of the countertop:

Under-cabinet light - straight vs angled patterns

Under-cabinet light – straight vs angled patterns

Those look pretty much the same, don’t they? So much for photography as evidence for anything.

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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  1. #1 by madbodger on 2016-12-20 - 12:37

    As you pointed out in your “Spectrometer: Quick and Dirty Image Processing” post, you don’t have to use photography directly to measure intensity distribution, you extract a strip from the image and graph it.

    • #2 by Ed on 2016-12-20 - 12:55

      Glad somebody’s paying attention around here; I forgot about that trick. [sigh]

      Angling the strip dimmed the light washing the wall beyond the counter and brightened the light spilling over onto the floor, to the extent there’s now a foot-wide bright strip along the middle of the floor where the light from both sides overlaps.

  1. Under-cabinet Lamp Brackets: Close-fit Power Plug | The Smell of Molten Projects in the Morning

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