Posts Tagged Improvements

Makergear M2: Octopi Camera Mount

Octopirint / Octopi works wonderfully well as a controller / G-Code feeder for my Makergear M2. After putting up with an ungainly mass of tape for far too long, I printed Toddman’s Pi Camera Mount:

Pi Camera - M2 Mount - Slic3r
Pi Camera – M2 Mount – Slic3r

Which snapped together exactly like it should:

Makergear M2 - Pi Camera Mount
Makergear M2 – Pi Camera Mount

A strip of double-sided foam tape attaches it to the Pi’s case, which is Velcro-ed to the M2’s frame. The cable may be too long, but avoids sharp bends on the way out of the case.

The whole lashup works fine:

Pi Camera - M2 Mount - Octopi timelapse
Pi Camera – M2 Mount – Octopi timelapse

That’s a second set intended for the CNC 3018-Pro, but it didn’t fit quite as well. The B brackets are slightly too long (or their pivots are slightly too close to their base) to allow the C plates to turn 90° to the mount:

Pi Camera - M2 Mount - Config 2 diagram
Pi Camera – M2 Mount – Config 2 diagram

Nothing one can’t fix with nibbling & filing, but I long for parametric designs …

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Alead Telecoil Receiver: Magnetic Field Check

I got an Alead / Nolan HearLinks (many adjectives) Telecoil receiver to boost my ability to hear music & presentations at Vassar, because they recently slotted telecoil loops into the floors of their public venues. It took a few concerts to get the appropriate volume setting, after which I wondered how sensitive the receiver was:

Alead T-coil receiver - test setup
Alead T-coil receiver – test setup

The small T in the upper right corner marks the receiving coil location, with the coil oriented parallel to the body’s long axis. It’s the secondary winding of an air-core transformer with a single-turn (perhaps using Litz wire) primary embedded in the floor, with the induced voltage obeying the usual transformer equation:

V = 2π µ₀ µr N A f H cos θ

Definitions:

  • µ₀ – vacuum permeability = 4π×10-7 H/m
  • µr – relative permeability
  • N – number of turns
  • A – receiver loop area, m²
  • f – signal frequency, Hz
  • H – magnetomotive force, A/m
  • θ – angle between windings

For a given installation and receiver position, pretty much everything is fixed, with the voltage depending only on the H field caused by the primary winding current.

The induced voltage is linearly dependent on the frequency, but the transmitter equalization filters apparently flatten the spectrum to get equal receiver amplitude between about 100 Hz and 5 kHz.

The coil in that picture has nine turns, with four passing through the Tek current probe. Applying 10 mVpp to the winding produces a corresponding current:

JDS6600 10mVpp 1 kHz - 4 turns - 1 mA-div
JDS6600 10mVpp 1 kHz – 4 turns – 1 mA-div

The scope sees 14 mVpp = 1.4 div at 1 mA/div = 1.4 mA. Dividing by 4 turns means the coil actually carryes 350 µA. The signal generator has a 50 Ω output impedance, so 10 mV should produce about 200 µA, which seems a bit low. On the other paw, the signal generator sees the coil as a dead short at 1 kHz, so I don’t trust the numbers.

Whatever magnetic flux it may be produces a 1 kHz tone at a somewhat higher volume (for the same receiver setting) than the fancy Vassar loops, so the flux is in the right ballpark. With a bit more attention to detail, perhaps I can tinker up a current-mode loop drive amplifier.

The Alead receiver has an internally generated tick audible at the audio volume I need for the Vassar loops, which is 5 to 7 steps down from the maximum volume at 15 steps. It seems related to the internal Bluetooth hardware, although it’s present even when the receiver is not paired with my Pixel phone and, in fact, is unchanged even when 100 feet from the nearest electronic device.

When I reported the problem, they said:

Yes, you can hear very minor tick sound on telecoil mode. It is caused by some electronic and current to make those tick sound. Sorry for this defective on the design.

It had one job that it doesn’t do well, so it’s on the way back for a refund.

Evidently, I must build an audio loop receiver to get what I want …

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GCMC Platter Engraving

Engraving Spirograph / Guilloché patterns on scrap CDs and hard drive platters now works better than ever:

Spirograph - 674203941 - preview
Spirograph – 674203941 – preview

After, that is, I realized:

  • Any Rotor will work, as long as it’s smaller than the Stator
  • You must pick pen offset L so the pattern never crosses the stator center point
  • L ≥ 1 is perfectly fine
  • You must scale the resulting pattern to fit the actual space on the disk

One of my final doodles showing how the variables relate to each other, although the Wikipedia article may be useful for the underlying math and other posts have more pix on various machines:

Spirograph Scaling doodles
Spirograph Scaling doodles

Cheat sheet:

  • Stator has tooth count (∝ radius) R
  • Rotor has tooth count (∝ radius) r
  • K = r/R, so if you normalize R=1, K=r
  • Pen offset L puts it at radius rL in the rotor

Picking a suitable rotor requires iterating with random choices until one fits:

  RotorTeeth = Stators[-1];
  n = 0;
  while (RotorTeeth >= floor(0.95 * StatorTeeth) || RotorTeeth < 5) {
    RotorTeeth = (XORshift() & 0x007f);       // this is why Stator can't have more than 127 teeth
    n++;
  }
  comment("Rotor: ",RotorTeeth," in ",n," iterations");

The 5% buffer on the high end ensures there will be an L keeping a hole in the middle of the pattern. Requiring at least five teeth on the low end just seems like a Good Idea.

Given the stator & rotor tooth counts, iterate on random L values until one works:

  n = 0;
  do {
    L = (to_float((XORshift() & 0x1f) + 1) / 32.0) * (1.0/K - 1.0);   // allow L > 1.0
    n++;
  } while (L >= (1.0/K - 1.0) || L < 0.01);
}
comment("Offset L: ", L," in ",n," iterations");

With L chosen to leave a hole in the middle of the pattern, then the pattern traced by the pen in the rotor is centered at 1.0 – K (the normalized Stator radius minus the normalized Rotor radius) and varies by ±LK (the offset times the normalized Rotor radius) on either side:

RotorMin = 1.0 - 2*K;
comment("Rotor Min: ",RotorMin);

BandCtr = 1.0 - K;                      // band center radius
BandMin = BandCtr - L*K;                //  ... min radius
BandMax = BandCtr + L*K;                //  ... max radius

BandAmpl = BandMax - BandCtr;

comment("Band Min: ",BandMin," Ctr: ",BandCtr," Max: ",BandMax);

Knowing that, rescaling the pattern to fit the disk limits goes like this:

FillPath = {};

foreach (Path; pt) {

  a = atan_xy(pt);                      // recover angle to point
  r = length(pt);                       //  ... radius to point

  br = (r - BandCtr) / BandAmpl;        // remove center bias, rescale to 1.0 amplitude
  dr = br * (OuterRad - MidRad);        // rescale to fill disk
  pr = dr + MidRad;                     // set at disk centerline

  x = pr * cos(a);                      // find new XY coords
  y = pr * sin(a);

  FillPath += {[x,y]};
}

comment("Path has ",count(FillPath)," points");

The final step prunes coordinates so close together as to produce no useful motion, which I define to be 0.2 mm:

PointList = {FillPath[0]};                // must include first point

lp = FillPath[0];
n = 0;

foreach (FillPath; pt) {
  if (length(pt - lp) <= Snuggly) {       // discard too-snuggly point
    n++;
  }
  else {
    PointList += {pt};                    // otherwise, add it to output
    lp = pt;
  }
}

PointList += {FillPath[-1]};                // ensure closure at last point

comment("Pruned ",n," points, ",count(PointList)," remaining");

The top of the resulting G-Code file contains all the various settings for debugging:

(Disk type: CD)
(Outer Diameter: 117.000mm)
(        Radius: 58.500mm)
(Inner Diameter: 38.000mm)
(        Radius: 19.000mm)
(Mid Diameter: 77.500mm)
(      Radius: 38.750mm)
(Legend Diameter: 30.000mm)
(         Radius: 15.000mm)
(PRNG seed: 674203941)
(Stator 8: 71)
(Rotor: 12 in 1 iterations)
(Dia ratio K: 0.169 1/K: 5.917)
(GCD: 1)
(Lobes: 71)
(Turns: 12)
(Offset L: 3.227 in 1 iterations)
(Rotor Min: 0.662)
(Band Min: 0.286 Ctr: 0.831 Max: 1.376)
(Path has 43201 points)
(Pruned 14235 points, 28968 remaining)

The GCMC source code as a GitHub Gist:

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CNC 3018-Pro: Hard Drive Platter Fixture

A variation on the CD fixture produces a 3.5 inch hard drive platter fixture:

Platter Fixtures - Hard Drive on 3018
Platter Fixtures – Hard Drive on 3018

Which needed just a touch of milling for a snug fit around the platter:

CNC 3018-Pro - HD platter fixture - test fit
CNC 3018-Pro – HD platter fixture – test fit

Tape it down on the 3018’s platform, set XY=0 at the center, and It Just Works™:

CNC 3018-Pro - HD platter fixture - 70 g
CNC 3018-Pro – HD platter fixture – 70 g

The rather faint line shows engraving at -1.0 mm = 70 g downforce isn’t quite enough. Another test with the same pattern at -3.0 mm = 140 g came out better:

CNC 3018-Pro - HD platter fixture - 140 g
CNC 3018-Pro – HD platter fixture – 140 g

It’s in the same OpenSCAD file as the CD fixture, in the unlikely event you need one.

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MPCNC: Z-Axis Height Probe

A slight modification to the MPCNC LM12UU collet pen holder turns it into a long-reach Z-Axis Height Probe:

CNC 3018-Pro - Z-Axis height probe - overview
CNC 3018-Pro – Z-Axis height probe – overview

A flange on the top plate holds a Makerbot-style endstop switch:

Collet Holder - LM12UU - switch plate - solid model
Collet Holder – LM12UU – switch plate – solid model

The brass probe rod sports a 3/32 inch ball epoxied on its tip, although for my simple needs I could probably use the bare rod:

CNC 3018-Pro - Z-Axis height probe - ball tip detail
CNC 3018-Pro – Z-Axis height probe – ball tip detail

I clamped the rod to extend a bit beyond the plate, where it can soak up most of the switch release travel, leaving just enough to reset the clickiness after each probe:

CNC 3018-Pro - Z-Axis height probe - detail
CNC 3018-Pro – Z-Axis height probe – detail

The probe responds only to Z motion, not tip deflection in XY, so it’s not particularly good for soft objects with sloped sides, like the insole shown above. It works fine for rigid objects and should suffice to figure the modeling workflow.

The bCNC Auto-Level probe routine scans a grid over a rectangular region:

Insole - bCNC AutoLevel Probe Map - detail
Insole – bCNC AutoLevel Probe Map – detail

Which Meshlab turns into a solid model:

Insole - Meshlab triangulation
Insole – Meshlab triangulation

That’s the bottom of the insole probed on a 5 mm grid, which takes something over an hour to accomplish.

The OpenSCAD code as a GitHub Gist:

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CNC 3018-Pro: CD Fixture Probe Camera Target

Taping the CD fixture to the CNC 3018-Pro’s raised platform solves the repeatability problem by putting the CD at a fixed location relative to the machine’s Home coordinates. The next step puts the XY=0 coordinate origin at the exact center of the platter, so the pattern comes out exactly centered on the disc:

CNC 3018-Pro - CD fixture
CNC 3018-Pro – CD fixture

The fixture has a central boss:

Platter Fixtures - CD on 3018 - tape flange
Platter Fixtures – CD on 3018 – tape flange

The blue boss centers the CD’s hub hole, the red plateau supports the disc, and the white background lies 5 mm below the CD’s upper surface:

CNC 3018-Pro - CD holder target
CNC 3018-Pro – CD holder target

Yup, red and blue Sharpies FTW.

The bCNC probe camera image includes two faint cyan rings centered on the crosshair:

CNC 3018-Pro - bCNC probe camera - red-blue CD target
CNC 3018-Pro – bCNC probe camera – red-blue CD target

Set the diameter to 15 mm (or a bit less), center the outer ring on the hub hole = the border between blue & red, set XY=0, and it’s within maybe ±0.1 mm of the true center.

Done!

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bCNC Probe Camera Calibration

I’m sure I’ll do this again some time …

Focus the camera at whatever distance needed to clear the longest tooling you’ll use or, at least, some convenient distance from the platform. You must touch off Z=0 at the surface before using bCNC’s probe camera alignment, because it will move the camera to the preset focus distance.

Align the camera’s optical axis perpendicular to the table by making it stare into a mirror flat on the platform, then tweaking the camera angles until the crosshair centers on the reflected lens image. This isn’t dead centered, but it’s pretty close:

CNC 3018-Pro - bCNC Probe Camera - collimation - detail
CNC 3018-Pro – bCNC Probe Camera – collimation – detail

The camera will be focused on the mirror, not the reflection, as you can tell by the in-focus crud on the mirror. Whenever you focus the lens, you’ll probably move the optical axis, so do the best you can with the fuzzy image.

You can adjust small misalignments with the Haircross (seems backwards to me) Offset values.

A cheap camera’s lens barrel may not be aligned with its optical axis, giving the lens a jaunty tilt when it’s correctly set up:

CNC 3018-Pro - Engraving - taped
CNC 3018-Pro – Engraving – taped

With the camera focus set correctly, calibrate the camera Offset from the tool (a.k.a. Spindle) axis:

  • Put a pointy tool at XY=0
  • Touch off Z=0 on a stack of masking tape
  • Put a dent in the tape with the bit
  • Move to the camera’s focused Z level
  • Make the dent more conspicuous with a Sharpie, as needed
  • Register the spindle location
  • Jog to center the crosshair on the dent
  • Register the camera location

Calibrate the Crosshair ring diameter thusly:

  • Put an object with a known size on the platform
  • Touch off Z=0 at its surface
  • Move to the camera’s focused Z level
  • Set the Crosshair diameter equal to the known object size
  • Adjust the Scale value to make the Crosshair overlay reality

For example, calibrating the diameter to 10 mm against a shop scale:

CNC 3018-Pro Probe Camera - scale factor - detail
CNC 3018-Pro Probe Camera – scale factor – detail

At 10 mm above the CD, setting the camera’s resolution to 11.5 pixel/mm:

CNC 3018-Pro - bCNC probe camera - settings
CNC 3018-Pro – bCNC probe camera – settings

Makes the outer circle exactly 15.0 mm in diameter to match the CD hub ring ID:

CNC 3018-Pro - bCNC probe camera - red-blue CD target
CNC 3018-Pro – bCNC probe camera – red-blue CD target

I doubt anybody can find the pixel/mm value from first principles, so you must work backwards from an object’s actual size.

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