First Year Diary

Another layer of the memorabilia box produced my mother’s 1953 diary, with the first entry in my father’s hand:

Diary - March 18 1953
Diary – March 18 1953

With the benefit of hindsight, some entries stand out:

Diary - May 2 1953
Diary – May 2 1953

These were certainly not fresh from the garden:

Diary - May 8 1953
Diary – May 8 1953

Perhaps reaching this stage required some persuasion:

Diary - June 30 1953
Diary – June 30 1953

This required me to be outdoors:

Diary - July 2 1953
Diary – July 2 1953

Mom’s case of “strep throat” required three penicillin injections to knock it down:

Diary - July 22 1953
Diary – July 22 1953

I get up a little earlier and go to bed a little later nowadays, but I see absolutely nothing wrong with any of this:

Diary - August 27 1953
Diary – August 27 1953

My eyesight was much better back then:

Diary - September 29 1953
Diary – September 29 1953

Definitely an omen:

Diary - December 8 1953
Diary – December 8 1953

My parents ran a restaurant out of the house:

Nisleys Restaurant sign
Nisleys Restaurant sign

As you might expect, the diary tapers off after the first year.

12 thoughts on “First Year Diary

    1. It’s been sitting at the foot of the basement stairs for decades: I sometimes smile when I see the thing.

      AFAICT, my father got into the restaurant biz because he needed a job after his South Sea Island tour, not because he had any particular chef-like skills. I think he (and, after a few years, his new wife) learned by doing over the next couple of decades. [grin]

  1. Penicillin injections were quite painful: I think they were prepared by mixing penicillin powder and peanut oil and injecting it intramuscularly. They (and a country doctor who thought it was a cure-all) are why I loathe needles to this day.

    1. OW!

      She wore a mask to avoid scaring the kid with a day-long grimace …

      I remember big glass syringes with loopy stainless steel finger handles and chonky reusable needles: more reasons why the world is a better place nowadays.

      1. My childhood dentist used such for novocaine injections, so I stopped getting the shots.

        That tends to explain why most of my childhood fillings had to be redone as an adult. That doctor used much better equipment.

  2. It appears to have taken four months to abandon calling you Elmer. I wonder why it took so long.

    1. Maybe they wanted to see if I was a keeper? [grin]

      Dad was Elmer Edwin, universally known as Nis, and I’m Elmer Edward, called Ed, because they didn’t want a Junior underfoot. This made perfect sense at the time.

      Protip: Having a kid go by his middle name is a catastrophically Bad Idea™, because all of his paperwork will never be up to par.

        1. And, yeah, hadda get an amateur radio license …

          I wanted to be a doctor, until I realized how much gore was involved. Then a fighter jet pilot, until I realized nearsightedness was a disqualifier. Then I evolved into an engineering bear.

          In a previous life, I was surely chipping spear points so the other guys could go hunting …

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