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APRS iGate KE4ZNU-10: Southern Coverage

A pleasant Friday morning ride with several stops:

KE4ZNU-9 - APRS Reception - 2016-09-09

KE4ZNU-9 – APRS Reception – 2016-09-09

KE4ZNU-10 handled the spots near Red Oaks Mill, along parts of Vassar Rd that aren’t hidden by that bluff, and along Rt 376 north of the airport.

The KB2ZE-4 iGate in the upper left corner caught most of the spots; it has a much better antenna in a much better location than the piddly mobile antenna in our attic.

Several of the spots along the southern edge of the trip went through the K2PUT-15 digipeater high atop Mt. Ninham near Carmel, with coverage of the entire NY-NJ-CT area.

The APRS-IS database filters out packets received by multiple iGates, so there’s only one entry per spot.

All in all, KE4ZNU-10 covers the southern part of our usual biking range pretty much the way I wanted.

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  1. #1 by Hexley Ball on 2016-09-28 - 12:11

    “it has a much better antenna in a much better location than the piddly mobile antenna in our attic.”

    FWIW, I had a mobile antenna in the attic that was replaced by a homebrew J-pole mounted on the eaves and that change was good for several S-units. Essentially a zero cost upgrade. It was useful for our last community simulated emergency drill, which required simplex communication with town hall on 2 meters.

    MIght be something to consider if you want to improve coverage at some point.

    • #2 by Ed on 2016-09-29 - 09:32

      I saved a dual-band base station antenna for this very purpose, but it’ll take a bit of finesse to get into the attic and out of the way. I became immensely reluctant to put antennas outside after a lightning strike chewed up the concrete garage apron…

      • #3 by Jim Register on 2016-09-29 - 16:48

        Speaking of lightning, have you heard of http://www.lightningmaps.org ? They have multiple receivers around the world that sense strikes and upload the time of each event and the receiver location/id to a central server. They correlate the data and triangulate to map the location.

        It was interesting seeing the strikes in near real time and hearing the thunder just as they show the front passing our location.

        Jim

        • #4 by Ed on 2016-09-30 - 11:08

          Now that is fascinating!

          Obviously, I must up my VLF game…