Hunting Spider

Back in the early 1950s, Anderson’s state-of-the-art awning windows had screens on the inside: you must open the screen to open or close the window. This surely seemed like a good idea at the time, but in practice we don’t open the screen very much, very often, during peak insect season, as insects tend to collect on the outer surface.

We’ve learned to live with the smaller bugs, but this critter gave me pause one evening:

Hunting Spider on Window Screen

Hunting Spider on Window Screen

It’s a Hunting Spider (or, more exactly, a Wolf Spider), perched on the outside of the screen, inside the (opened) window. The (hard inch) screen grid is about 70×55 mils, so those legs span about 2-1/8 inch, call it 55 mm.

We’re big fans of spiders, but this portends a bit more intimacy than I’m comfortable with. I blew through the screen to tickle its tummy until it moved outside the window frame, then opened the screen and closed the window without pause.

Wake up with one of those on your pillow and tell me how it works for you.

  1. #1 by matthias1982 on 2013-10-13 - 08:21

    Haha – I like spiders, but please not on my pillow! Can imagine how you felt like! :-)
    I once slept in a hut in Guinea, Africa – when I woke up and switched on my flashlight, I saw a “huge” spider sitting 5 cm above my head on the outside of my mosquito net… fortunately on the outside!

    • #2 by Ed on 2013-10-13 - 08:37

      And your heart went pitter-patter for the next half hour.

      Dad was in the South Pacific during WWII and said that, after a while, you got used to shaking the scorpions out of your boots in the morning…

      • #3 by madbodger on 2013-10-13 - 11:36

        I grew up in Florida, where you got used to shaking the roaches out of your shoes in the morning, so when I went to visit my sweetie’s parents in Arizona, doing the same thing for scorpions came naturally.

        • #4 by Ed on 2013-10-13 - 22:09

          Naturally to you, maybe… [grin]

  2. #5 by macca1945 on 2013-10-13 - 18:22

    My mother used to let them stay on the ceiling even in the bedroom, until one fell off the ceiling one night into her bed.

    • #6 by Ed on 2013-10-13 - 22:08

      I rest my case… we deport spiders outdoors, where they can do what comes naturally.

  3. #7 by Jason Doege on 2013-10-14 - 00:21

    One of those bit my Lhasa Apso, years ago and he went into convulsions for about 5 minutes. He came out the other side OK, but we sure were scared for him.

    • #8 by Ed on 2013-10-14 - 07:59

      bit my Lhasa Apso

      Spider looked up at the dog and thought “Yeah, I can take that thing down…”