Hexagonal Chain Mail

Everybody at the Squidwrench Show-n-Tell loved the chain mail. I printed up a sheet of Ablapo’s hexagonal chain mail before the show (because it takes forever) and it came out very nicely on the M2’s larger platform:

Hexagonal Chain Mail - on platform

Hexagonal Chain Mail – on platform

The first layers sprinkle a bazillion little shapes all over the platform:

Hexagonal Chain Mail - first layer

Hexagonal Chain Mail – first layer

It makes a nice doily for my desk lamp:

Hexagonal Chain Mail - lamp doily

Hexagonal Chain Mail – lamp doily

The odd blue coloration must be an optical effect, because it’s not visible on the black PLA.

  1. #1 by madbodger on 2013-05-30 - 09:07

    At first, I thought your desk lamp had a black 5-way binding post on the top of it, which would be an odd feature. A closer look revealed that it was an ordinary knob, which makes more sense.

    • #2 by Ed on 2013-05-30 - 09:14

      a black 5-way binding post

      Where do you connect the line cord’s hot wire? [grin]

      • #3 by Jason Doege on 2013-05-30 - 12:02

        It is absolutely shocking that you would suggest something that evil.

  2. #4 by Jetguy on 2013-05-30 - 09:57

    I have a theory on the blue tint. Ever notice how black Sharpie marker turns a bluish purple, especially if you say put a drop of rubbing alcohol on it (that’s the easiest way to remove it from most plastics). I think the same black pigments actually do the same thing and for whatever reason, cameras and the bright light really bring out that effect. The truth is, most pigments are not monochromatic. Ideally, black would be pure carbon black, but I doubt that is the case.

    • #5 by Ed on 2013-05-31 - 07:38

      pure carbon black, but I doubt that is the case

      You’re probably right about that: it’s a combination of dyes and pigments. For all I know, black filament is what you get when you mix all the scraps together and add enough dye to cover up the other colors.

      I’m sure there’s an interaction with the hand-knit top surface common to all 3D extrusions, down inside the first few microns of the plastic, too.