Posts Tagged M2

Under-cabinet Lamp Brackets

These blocky brackets hold a pair of LED light strips in the recess under our 1955-era kitchen cabinets, to let the light cover the entire counter:

Kitchen Light Bracket

Kitchen Light Bracket

The large holes are for drywall screws into the cabinet, the smaller ones for 2.5 mm SHCS holding the strips to the brackets. I drilled those little holes out and installed 4-40 brass inserts; this being a one-off installation, the source code doesn’t include that change.

There’s not much to see after they’re installed:

Under-cabinet light bracket - center joiner

Under-cabinet light bracket – center joiner

I’d hoped to swap the ends of the strip to power it from the right end, but the guts aren’t symmetric and you can’t just flip it end-for-end:

eShine LED Under-cabinet light - disassembled

eShine LED Under-cabinet light – disassembled

That’s an add-on unit without the IR proximity sensor circuitry and power switch, but with the same overall layout. You take it apart by pressing the obvious latch on one of the endcaps, then gently prying the plastic away from the aluminum extrusion, taking care not to wreck the coaxial socket. Reassemble in reverse order.

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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Kenmore Progressive Vacuum Tool Adapters: Second Failure

Pretty much as expected, the dust brush nozzle failed again, adjacent to the epoxy repair:

Dust brush adapter - second break

Dust brush adapter – second break

A bit of rummaging turned up some ¾ inch Schedule 40 PVC pipe which, despite the fact that no plumbing measurement corresponds to any physical attribute, had about the right OD to fit inside the adapter’s ID:

Dust brush - PVC reinforcement

Dust brush – PVC reinforcement

The enlarged bore leaves just barely enough space for a few threads around the circumference. Fortunately, the pipe OD is a controlled dimension, because it must fit inside all the molded PVC elbows / tees / caps / whatever.

The pipe ID isn’t a controlled dimension and, given that the walls seemed far too thick for this purpose, I deployed the boring bar:

Dust brush adapter - reinforced tube - boring

Dust brush adapter – reinforced tube – boring

That’s probably too much sticking out of the chuck, but sissy cuts saved the day. The carriage stop keeps the boring bar 1 mm away from the whirling chuck.

Bandsaw it to length and face the ends:

Dust brush adapter - reinforcement

Dust brush adapter – reinforcement

The PVC tube extends from about halfway along the steep taper from the handle fitting out to the end, with the section closest to the handle making the most difference.

Ram it flush with the end:

Dust brush adapter - reinforced tube - detail

Dust brush adapter – reinforced tube – detail

I thought about gluing it in place, but it’s a sufficiently snug press fit that I’m sure it won’t go anywhere.

Natural PETG probably isn’t the right color:

Dust brush adapter - reinforced tube - installed

Dust brush adapter – reinforced tube – installed

Now, let’s see how long that repair lasts …

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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TCRT5000 Proximity Sensor Mount

Having a few TCRT5000 proximity sensors lying around, I used one for the Color Mixer so folks could just wave a finger to flip the LED colors, rather than pound relentlessly on the top plate:

Color mixer - controls

Color mixer – controls

The stem fits into a slot made with a 3/8 inch end mill:

Prox Sensor Bezel - Slic3r preview

Prox Sensor Bezel – Slic3r preview

You move the cutter by the length of the sensor (10.0 mm will work) to make the slot. In practical terms, drill a hole at the midpoint, insert the cutter, then move ±5.0 mm from the center:

Prox sensor panel cut

Prox sensor panel cut

A bead of epoxy around the stem on the bottom of the panel should hold it in place forevermore.

The rectangular inner hole came out a tight push fit for the TCRT5000 sensor, so I didn’t bother gluing it in place and, surprisingly, it survived the day unscathed!

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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Vacuum Tube LEDs: 6H6GT Dual Diode

Having accumulated a set of octal tube base clamps, it’s now a matter of selecting the proper clamp for each tube:

Octal tube base V-block clamps

Octal tube base V-block clamps

The process of shell-drilling the tube base, drilling the hard drive platter, printing a tube socket and case, wiring up the Arduino and base LED, then assembling the whole thing requires a bit of manual labor, assisted by some moderately exotic shop machinery.

The getter flash atop this small 6H6GT dual diode tube rules out a cap and there’s not enough space for a side light:

6H6GT - on platter

6H6GT – on platter

Fortunately, the base LED completely lights the internal glass:

6H6GT - purple phase

6H6GT – purple phase

The slowly changing color would make a fine night light:

6H6GT - cyan phase

6H6GT – cyan phase

It must be Art!

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Vacuum Tube LEDs: 5U4GB Vacuum Rectifier with Sidelight

A larger version of the V-block clamp accommodates the 35 mm = 1-3/8 inch octal base of a 5U4GB Full-Wave Vacuum Rectifier tube:

5U4GB - spigot milling

5U4GB – spigot milling

The evacuation tip nearly touched the inside end of the base spigot!

I had to cut the shaft and half the body off the shell drill in order to fit it into the space above the tube base and below the chuck:

5U4GB - base shell drilling

5U4GB – base shell drilling

A slightly larger shell drill would still fit within the pin circle, but the maximum possible hole diameter in the base really isn’t all that much larger:

5U4GB - base opening

5U4GB – base opening

The getter flash covers the entire top of this tube, so I conjured a side light for a rectangular knockoff Neopixel:

Vacuum Tube Lights - side light - solid model

Vacuum Tube Lights – side light – solid model

There’s no orientation that doesn’t require support:

Vacuum Tube Lights - side light support - Slic3r preview

Vacuum Tube Lights – side light support – Slic3r preview

A little prying with a small screwdriver and some pulling with a needlenose pliers extracted those blobs. All the visible surfaces remained undamaged and I cleaned up the curved side with a big rat-tail file.

I wired the Arduino and Neopixels, masked a spot on the side of the tube (to improve both alignment and provide protection from slobbered epoxy), applied epoxy, and taped it in place until it cured:

5U4GB - sidelight epoxy curing

5U4GB – sidelight epoxy curing

The end result looks great:

5U4GB Full-wave vacuum rectifier - side and base illumination

5U4GB Full-wave vacuum rectifier – side and base illumination

 

It currently sends Morse code through the base LED, but it’s much too stately for that.

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Reticle Guide for Ruler Quilting

I made the pencil guides to help Mary design ruler quilting patterns, but sometimes she must line up the ruler with a feature on an existing pattern. To that end, we now have a reticle guide:

Ruler Adapters - pencil guide and reticle

Ruler Adapters – pencil guide and reticle

The general idea is that it’s easier to see the pattern on paper through the crosshair than through a small hole. You put the button over a feature, align the reticle, put the ruler against the button, replace it with pencil guide, and away you go.

The solid model looks much more lively than you’d expect:

Ruler Adapter - reticle - Slic3r preview

Ruler Adapter – reticle – Slic3r preview

Printing up a pair of each button produces the same surface finish as before; life is good!

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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Pencil Guides for Ruler Quilting

Mary has been doing Ruler Quilting and wanted a pencil guide (similar to the machine’s ruler foot) to let her sketch layouts before committing stitches to fabric. The general idea is to offset the pencil by 1/4 inch from the edge of the ruler:

Ruler Adapter - solid model

Ruler Adapter – solid model

That was easy.

Print three to provide a bit of cooling time and let her pass ’em around at her next quilting bee:

Ruler Adapter - Slic3r preview

Ruler Adapter – Slic3r preview

Her favorite doodling pencil shoves a 0.9 mm lead through a 2 mm ferrule, so ream the center hole with a #44 drill (86 mil = 2.1 mm) to suit:

Ruler quilting pencil guides

Ruler quilting pencil guides

The outer perimeters have 64 facets, an unusually high number for my models, so they’re nice & smooth on the ruler. Even though I didn’t build them sequentially, they had zero perimeter zits and the OD came out 0.500 inch on the dot.

The chamfers guide the pencil point into the hole and provide a bit of relief for the pencil’s snout.

If I had a laser cutter, I could make special rulers for her, too …

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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