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Posts Tagged M2

JYE Tech DSO150 Oscilloscope: Battery Power

With the DSO150 scope running, I printed Geoff’s DSO150 case + battery holder from Thingiverse, added a few bits & pieces from the heap, and came up with a completely portable scope:

DSO150 battery hack - first light

DSO150 battery hack – first light

The only scope mod consists of embedding a JST-ish connector in the back panel:

DSO150 battery hack - rear panel connector

DSO150 battery hack – rear panel connector

Then soldering it to the battery pads and applying generous hot-melt glue blobs:

DSO150 battery hack - PCB power

DSO150 battery hack – PCB power

Add a scrap 18650 Li-Ion cell, a regulated boost converter, and a switch:

DSO150 battery hack - interior

DSO150 battery hack – interior

The switch is directly below the DSO150 BNC connector to get a little protection for its handle, which would otherwise stick out in harm’s way. This being an afterthought, I drilled the switch hole, rather than modify the solid model.

Some testing with a bench supply showed that the DSO150 will not operate correctly from the voltages produced by a pair of lithium cells, despite what you’d think from looking at the case. Below 8 V, the internally generated negative supply becomes larger than the positive supply, so the 0 V point isn’t properly centered and the scope loses headroom for large signals; monitoring the internal 3.3 V test signal makes the problem painfully obvious.

More color commentary from my summary email:

  • Combining a case from Thingiverse with a Li-Ion cell and a regulated boost converter produces a portable scope.
  • The PCB has provision for battery input, so I drilled / filed a square hole for a teeny JST-ish connector on the back panel, secured it with a blob of hot melt glue, and globbed the wires onto the PCB battery pads.
  • The boost converter draws about 400 mA from the cell, so a 2500-ish mA·h cell should last Long Enough™. This is a scrap cell from the recycle box and gave out after maybe four hours.
  • It idles at 8 mA, so I drilled a hole in the back of the case for a toggle switch disconnecting the battery; you’d want the hole in the solid model. Perhaps a better converter would have lower idle current; you’d never be able to tell from the eBay descriptions.
  • Aaaaand it switches around 200 kHz under load, just barely beyond the scope bandwidth. It doesn’t add much noise to the signal, at least with a 50 Ω terminator jammed in the BNC, but the square-wave “cal” output looks awful at 50 mV/div; a real scope shows even more noise. I assume the noise comes directly from the logic supply; with luck, the DSO150’s analog circuitry has Good Enough™ filtering.
  • Which might not matter for logic-level and moderate analog signals, of course, which is the whole point of the DSO150.
  • Conspicuous by their absence: a Li-Ion cell protection PCB and any way to recharge the poor thing …

I’ve occasionally wanted a portable scope and now I have one!

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Sony NP-BX1 Battery Holder: SMT Pogo Pin Contacts

The original camera battery test fixtures used contact pins conjured from hulking gold-plated connector pins and coil springs:

Canon NB-6L holder - contact pin detail

Canon NB-6L holder – contact pin detail

The Sony HDR-AS30V camera chewed up and spat out a handful of batteries, all tested in the NP-BX1 test fixture:

NP-BX1 Holder - show layout

NP-BX1 Holder – show layout

Nowadays, SMT pogo pins produce a much more compact holder, so I figured I could put all those batteries to good use:

NP-BX1 Holder - SMT pogo pins

NP-BX1 Holder – SMT pogo pins

That’s the long-suffering astable multivibrator, still soldered to its CR123A holder.

Obviously, the battery holder should grow ears to anchor the 14 AWG copper posts and would look better in black PETG:

NP-BX1 Battery Holder - 1.5mm pins - solid model

NP-BX1 Battery Holder – 1.5mm pins – solid model

The battery lead wires get soldered to the ends of the pogo pins and are recessed into the slot in the end of the fixture. I used clear epoxy to anchor everything in place.

Fits perfectly and works fine!

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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Makergear M2 V4 Nozzle: More Silicone!

A Makergear forum discussion on PETG hair and the prevention thereof prompted me to take a look at the silicone coating I’d applied to the nozzle:

M2 - nozzle silicone - applied

M2 – nozzle silicone – applied

That was ten months ago. This is now:

M2 Nozzle - worn silicone coat

M2 Nozzle – worn silicone coat

The camera sees the nozzle in a mirror laid flat on the platform, making the image less crisp than a direct view.

So the silicone seems a bit worn around the tip, has acquired a few firmly adhered globs, and definitely isn’t as shiny.

Rather than (try to) peel it off and reapply a new coating, I picked off the globs, cleaned around the nozzle, and slobbered a thin layer atop the existing silicone:

M2 Nozzle - more silicone

M2 Nozzle – more silicone

Extruding a few millimeters of filament pushed the film off the nozzle opening and it now works as well as it ever did.

 

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Kindle Fire Picture Frame: Side Block

A steel frame that Came With The House™ emerged from a hidden corner and, instants before tossing it in the recycle heap, I realized it had excellent upcycling potential:

Kindle Fire Picture Frame - Test Run

Kindle Fire Picture Frame – Test Run

Stipulated: I need better pictures for not-so-techie audiences.

Anyhow, my long-disused Kindle Fire fits perfectly into the welded-on clips, with just enough room for a right-angle USB cable, and Photo Frame Slideshow Premium does exactly what’s necessary to show pictures from internal storage with no network connection.

All I needed was a small block holding the Kindle against the far side of the frame:

Kindle Frame - side blocks

Kindle Frame – side blocks

A strip of double-stick carpet tape holds the block onto the frame. To extract the Kindle, should the need arise, slide it upward to clear the bottom clips, rotate it rearward, and out it comes.

Getting a good block required three tries, because the basement has cooled off enough to trigger Marlin’s Thermal Runaway protection for the M2’s platform heater. A test fit after the first failure showed the long leg was 1 mm too wide and, after the second failure, I reduced the fan threshold to 15 s and the minimum layer time to 5 s, producing the third block without incident.

The platform heater runs at 40 V and I considered bumping it to 43 V for a 15% power boost, but it has no trouble keeping up when the fan isn’t blowing chilly basement air across its surface.

The OpenSCAD source code, such as it is, doesn’t deserve its own GitHub Gist:

// Block to hold Kindle in a picture frame mount
// Ed Nisley - KE4ZNU
// November 2018

Protrusion = 0.1;

difference() {

  cube([18,44,10]);
  translate([-Protrusion,-Protrusion,-Protrusion])
    cube([18-4 + Protrusion,44-10 + Protrusion,10 + 2*Protrusion]);

}

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Kenmore Progressive Vacuum Tool Adapters: Third Failure

The adapter for an old Electrolux crevice tool (not the dust brush) snapped at the usual stress concentration after about three years:

Crevice tool adapter - broken vs PVC pipe

Crevice tool adapter – broken vs PVC pipe

The lower adapter is the new version, made from a length of 1 inch PVC pipe (that’s the ID, kinda-sorta) epoxied into a revised Kenmore adapter fitting.

The original OpenSCAD model provided the taper dimensions:

Electrolux Crevice Tool Adapter - PVC taper doodles

Electrolux Crevice Tool Adapter – PVC taper doodles

The taper isn’t quite as critical as it seems, because the crevice tool is an ancient molded plastic part, but a smidge over half a degree seemed like a good target.

Start by boring out the pipe ID until it’s Big Enough (or, equally, the walls aren’t Scary Thin) at 28 mm:

Crevice tool adapter - boring PVC

Crevice tool adapter – boring PVC

Alas, the mini-lathe’s craptastic compound has 2° graduations:

Minilathe compound angle scale

Minilathe compound angle scale

So I set the angle using a somewhat less craptastic protractor and angle gauge:

Crevice tool adapter - compound angle

Crevice tool adapter – compound angle

The little wedge of daylight near the gauge pivot is the difference between the normal perpendicular-to-the-spindle axis setting and half-a-degree-ish.

Turning PVC produces remarkably tenacious swarf:

Crevice tool adapter - PVC swarf

Crevice tool adapter – PVC swarf

The gash along the top comes from a utility knife; just pulling the swarf off didn’t work well at all.

The column of figures down the right side of the doodles shows successive approximations to the target angle, mostly achieved by percussive adjustment, eventually converging to about the right taper with the proper dimensions.

Cutting off the finished product with the (newly angled) cutoff bit:

Crevice tool adapter - cutoff

Crevice tool adapter – cutoff

And then It Just Worked™.

The OpenSCAD source code for all the adapters as a GitHub Gist:

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MPCNC: Drag Knife Holder

My attempt to use a HP 7475A plotter as a vinyl cutter failed due to its 19 g pen load limit:

HP 7475A knife stabilizer - big nut weight

HP 7475A knife stabilizer – big nut weight

The MPCNC, however, can apply plenty of downforce, so I tinkered up a quick-and-dirty adapter to put the drag knife “pen” body into the MPCNC’s standard DW660 router holder:

MPCNC - DW660 adapter drag knife holder - fixed position

MPCNC – DW660 adapter drag knife holder – fixed position

That’s using the DW660 adapter upside-down to get the business end of the knife closer to the platform. The solid model descends from the linear-bearing Sakura pen holder by ruthless pruning.

It didn’t work well at all, because you really need a spring for some vertical compliance and control over the downforce pressure.

Back to the Comfy Chair:

Drag Knife Holder - DW660 Mount - solid model

Drag Knife Holder – DW660 Mount – solid model

A trio of the lightest springs from a 200 piece assortment (in the front left compartment) pushes the upper plate downward against the drag knife’s flange:

MPCNC - DW660 adapter drag knife holder - spring loaded

MPCNC – DW660 adapter drag knife holder – spring loaded

There’s a bit more going on than may be obvious at first glance.

The screws slide in brass tubing press-fit into the upper plate, because otherwise their threads hang up on the usual 3D printed layers inside the (drilled-out) holes. Smaller free-floating brass tubing snippets inside the springs keep them away from the screw threads; the gap between the top of the tubing and the screw head limits the vertical compliance to 3 mm. The screws thread into brass inserts epoxied into the bottom disk, with a dab of low-strength Loctite for stay-put adjustment.

I bored the orange PETG disk to a nice slip fit around the knife body:

DW660 drag knife holder - boring body

DW660 drag knife holder – boring body

The upper plate also required fitting:

DW660 drag knife holder - boring plate

DW660 drag knife holder – boring plate

A few iterations produced reasonably smooth motion over a few millimeters, but it’s definitely not a low-friction / low-stiction drag knife holder. It ought to be good for some proof-of-concept vinyl cutting, though.

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

 

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Fireball Island Figures

A cousin asked if my 3D printer could replace some figures gone missing from their old Fireball Island game board, a classic apparently coming out in a new & improved version.

Fortunately, solid models exist on Thingiverse:

Fireball Island figure - Thingiverse 536867

Fireball Island figure – Thingiverse 536867

Unfortunately, the left arm requires support, which Slic3r supplies with great exuberance:

Fireball Island figure - Slic3r support

Fireball Island figure – Slic3r support

The vast tower on the figure’s right side (our left) seemed completely unnecessary, not to mention I have no enthusiasm for the peril inherent in chopping away so much plastic, so I replaced it with a simple in-model pillar:

Figure Support Mods

Figure Support Mods

The pillar leans from an adhesion-enhancing lily pad and ends one layer below the left hand, with all dimensions and angles chosen on the fly to make the answer come out right.

Works like a champ:

Fireball Island Figures - orange - on platform

Fireball Island Figures – orange – on platform

The dark band down the middle comes from the Pixel’s shutter.

They emerged with some PETG hair, the removal of which I left as an end-user experience.

I mailed a small box containing figures printed in my (limited!) palette of four colors, some spares Just In Case™, and a few QC rejects showing the necessity of lily pads.

Game on!

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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