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Posts Tagged M2

Juki TL-2010Q Needle LEDs: Simple Cable Clip

A straightforward cable clip:

TL-2010Q Needled COB LED - cable clip
TL-2010Q Needled COB LED – cable clip

It looks better than the previous hack bent from a snippet of PET clamshell:

Juki TL-2010Q Needle LEDs - cable clip
Juki TL-2010Q Needle LEDs – cable clip

Ream out the holes with suitable drills, clean out the slot using Tiny Bandsaw™, and it’s all good.

In retrospect, the slot isn’t worth the effort, because it doesn’t open wide enough to admit the cable and doesn’t provide any clamping force; a simple block with two holes would do as well. If the heatsink didn’t already have a 3 mm screw in play, I’d use an adhesive-backed clip from the early Kenmore LEDs.

The OpenSCAD source code isn’t much to look at:

//-----
// Cable clip
// Reoriented into build position, because we only need one

ClipWall = 3*ThreadWidth;
Clip = [15.0,10.0,CableOD + 2*ClipWall];

module CableClip(CableOD = 2.0) {

ClipSides = 4*3;
ClipRadius = Clip.y/2;
ScrewOD = 3.0;
ClipOC = Clip.x - ClipRadius - CableOD/2 - ClipWall;

  translate([0,0,Clip.y/2])
    rotate([90,0,90])
      translate([0,0,0*Clip.z/2])
        difference() {
          union() {
            rotate(180/ClipSides)
              cylinder(d=Clip.y/cos(180/ClipSides),h=Clip.z,$fn=ClipSides,center=true);
            translate([ClipRadius,0,0])
              cube([Clip.x - ClipRadius,Clip.y,Clip.z],center=true);
          }
          translate([0,0,-(Clip.z/2 + Protrusion)])
            rotate(180/8)
              PolyCyl(ScrewOD,Clip.z + 2*Protrusion,8);
          rotate([90,0,0])
            translate([ClipOC,0,-Clip.y])
              rotate(180/8)
              PolyCyl(CableOD,2*Clip.y,8);
          translate([ClipOC - Clip.x/2,0,0])
            cube([Clip.x,2*Clip.y,2*ThreadWidth],center=true);
        }
}

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SJCAM M20 Camera: Tour Easy Seat Mount

The general idea is to replace this:

M20 in waterproof case - Tour Easy seat
M20 in waterproof case – Tour Easy seat

With this:

SJCAM M20 Mount - Tour Easy side view
SJCAM M20 Mount – Tour Easy side view

Thereby solving two problems:

  • Pitifully small battery capacity
  • Wobbly camera support

The battery is an Anker PowerCore 13000 Power Bank plugged into the M20’s USB port. Given that SJCAM’s 1 A·h batteries barely lasted for a typical hour of riding, the 13 A·h PowerCore will definitely outlast my legs. The four blue dots just ahead of the strap around the battery show it’s fully charged and the blue light glowing through the case around the M20 indicates it’s turned on.

The solid model has four parts:

SJCAM M20 Mount - Fit layout
SJCAM M20 Mount – Fit layout

Which, as always, incorporates improvements based on the actual hardware on the bike.

A strap-and-buckle belt harvested from a defunct water pack holds the battery into the cradle and the cradle onto the rack, with a fuzzy velcro strip stuck to the bottom to prevent sliding:

SJCAM M20 Mount - Tour Easy rear view
SJCAM M20 Mount – Tour Easy rear view

The shell around the camera is basically a box minus the camera:

SJCAM M20 Mount - Show - shell
SJCAM M20 Mount – Show – shell

The shell builds as three separate slabs, with the center section having cutouts ahead of the camera’s projections to let it slide into place:

SJCAM M20 Mount - Show - shell sections
SJCAM M20 Mount – Show – shell sections

The new shell version is 30.5 mm thick, so a 40 mm screw will stick out maybe 5 mm beyond the nylon locknut. I trust the screws will get lost in the visual noise of the bike.

A peg sticking out behind the USB jack anchors the cable in place:

SJCAM M20 Mount - Show - shell sections - USB side
SJCAM M20 Mount – Show – shell sections – USB side

The front slab and center top have curves matching the M20 case:

SJCAM M20 Mount - Show - shell sections - button side
SJCAM M20 Mount – Show – shell sections – button side

The camera model has a tidy presentation option:

SJCAM M20 Mount - Show - M20 body
SJCAM M20 Mount – Show – M20 body

And an ugly option to knock the protruberances out of the shell:

SJCAM M20 Mount - Show - M20 body - knockouts
SJCAM M20 Mount – Show – M20 body – knockouts

The square-ish post on the base fits into an angled socket in the clamp around the seat rail:

SJCAM M20 Mount - Show - clamp
SJCAM M20 Mount – Show – clamp

The numbers correspond to the “Look Angle” of the socket pointing the camera toward overtaking traffic. The -20° in the first clamp shows a bit too much rack:

SJCAM M20 Mount - first ride - traffic - 2019-02-06
SJCAM M20 Mount – first ride – traffic – 2019-02-06

It may not matter, though, as sometimes you want to remember what’s on the right:

SJCAM M20 Mount - first ride - 2019-02-06
SJCAM M20 Mount – first ride – 2019-02-06

FWIW, the track veering off onto the grass came from a fat-tire bike a few days earlier. Most of the rail trail had cleared by the time we tried it, with some ice and snow in rock cuts and shaded areas.

Contrary to the first picture, I later remounted the camera under the seat rail with its top side downward. The M20 has a “rotate video” mode for exactly that situation, which I forgot to turn off in the fancy new mount, so I rotated the pix afterward.

A 3 mm screw extends upward through the hole in the socket to meet a threaded brass insert epoxied into the shell base, as shown in the uglified M20 model. Despite appearances, the hole is perpendicular to both the socket and the shell, so you can tweak the Look Angle without reprinting the shell.

All in all, the mount works well. We await better riding weather …

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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Makergear M2: Z-Axis Platform Sensor Switch, Replacement Thereof

After nearly four years of dangling a bare millimeter above the nozzle, the lever on the relocated Z-Axis switch finally snagged a stray thread and got bent out of shape. I un-bent it, but finally decided it was time to get more air between the nozzle and the switch actuator.

The small shim reduces the actuation distance:

file:///mnt/bulkdata/Cameras/2019/Shop Projects/Makergear M2/Z-Axis Switch/IMG_20190204_185300 - M2 Z-Axis - microswitch exterior
file:///mnt/bulkdata/Cameras/2019/Shop Projects/Makergear M2/Z-Axis Switch/IMG_20190204_185300 – M2 Z-Axis – microswitch exterior

Prying the ends outward with a thumbnail releases a pair of snaps and the cover pops off to reveal the innards:

M2 Z-Axis - microswitch interior
M2 Z-Axis – microswitch interior

The spring-loaded innards will launch themselves into the far corners of your shop, so be gentle as you slide the lever out and reinstall the side plate with a pair of clicks.

I filed the screw holes in my homebrew brass angle plate into slots, so as to get some adjustability, remounted the switch on the X-axis gantry, and tuned for best clearance:

M2 Z-Axis - bare microswitch vs nozzle
M2 Z-Axis – bare microswitch vs nozzle

It looks a bit more canted than it really is.

There’s about 1.6 mm of Z-axis distance between the nozzle and the switch, which should suffice for another few years.

The view from the front shows a slight angle, too:

M2 Z-Axis - activated
M2 Z-Axis – activated

There’s a millimeter or so below the nuts holding the X-axis linear slide in place, because the original 18 mm M3 SHCS are now 16 mm long (having shotgunned the metric SHCS and BHCS situation some time ago) and the washers are gone.

They’re all nylon lock nuts except for the one just to the left of the switch, providing barely enough clearance for the Powerpole connectors on the hotrod platform:

M2 Z-Axis - platform connector clearance
M2 Z-Axis – platform connector clearance

With the nozzle off the platform to the far right side, Z-axis homing proceeded normally. Manually jogging to Z=+5.0 mm left 2.6 mm of air under the nozzle, so I reset the offset in EEPROM to -2.4 = (2.6 – 5.0) mm:

M206 Z-2.4
M500

The first calibration square came out at 2.91 mm, so I changed the offset to -2.3 mm, got a 2.80 mm square with a firmly squished first layer, changed it to -2.5 mm, and got a 3.00 mm square for my efforts.

An array of five squares showed the platform remains level to within +0.05 / -0.07 mm:

M2 Platform Alignment Check - 2019-02-06
M2 Platform Alignment Check – 2019-02-06

I defined it to be Good Enough™ and quit while I was ahead.

The bottom two squares in the left pile have squished first layers. The rest look just fine:

M2 Z-Axis - switch offset calibration squares
M2 Z-Axis – switch offset calibration squares

The whole set-and-test process required about 45 minutes, most of which was spent waiting for the platform to reach 90 °C in the 14 °C Basement Laboratory.

Done!

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Vacuum Tube LEDs: Better Radome

A two-legged spider radome base definitely looks better than the four-legged version:

Arduino Pro Mini - NP-BX1 - radome
Arduino Pro Mini – NP-BX1 – radome

The radome base now has a hole punched in its bottom for the data lead, with the two power wires going out the sides as before:

Arduino Pro Mini Battery Holder - SK6812 radome base
Arduino Pro Mini Battery Holder – SK6812 radome base

The alert reader will notice the vertical strut on the far side doesn’t go directly into the center of its base fitting. I attempted a bit of cosmetic repair on the horizontal wire below the Pro Mini and discovered, not at all to my surprise, (re)soldering a connection to a 14 AWG copper wire an inch away from a 3D printed base doesn’t work well at all.

Doesn’t affect the function and, as nobody will ever notice, I’ll leave it be.

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Juki TL-2010Q: COB LED Light Bar

Mary needed more light under the arm of her Juki TL-2010Q sewing machine, so I proposed a 12 V 6 W COB LED module instead of the high-density LED strips I used on her Kenmore 158s:

Kenmore 158 Sewing Machine - Cool white LEDs - rear no flash
Kenmore 158 Sewing Machine – Cool white LEDs – rear no flash

Because the COB LEDs dissipate 6W, far more power than I’m comfortable dumping into a 3D printed structure, I redefined a length of aluminum shelf bracket extrusion to be a heatsink and epoxied the module’s aluminum back plate thereto:

Juki TL-2010Q COB LED - test lighting
Juki TL-2010Q COB LED – test lighting

Unlike the flexible LED strips, the COB LED modules have no internal ballast resistors and expect to run from a constant-current supply. Some preliminary testing showed we’d want less than the maximum possible light output, so a constant-voltage supply and a few ohms of ballast would suffice:

Juki TL-2010Q COB LED - ballast resistor test
Juki TL-2010Q COB LED – ballast resistor test

With all that in hand, the heatsink extrusion cried out for smooth endcaps to control the wires and prevent snagging:

TL-2010Q COB LED Light Bars - end caps - Show layout
TL-2010Q COB LED Light Bars – end caps – Show layout

The central hole in the left cap passes 24 AWG silicone wires from the power supply, with 28 AWG silicone wires snaking down through the L-shaped rectangular cutouts along the extrusion to the LED module’s solder pads.

The model includes built-in support:

TL-2010Q COB LED Light Bars - end caps - Build layout
TL-2010Q COB LED Light Bars – end caps – Build layout

Assuming the curved ends didn’t need support / anchors holding them down turned out to be completely incorrect:

Juki TL-2010Q COB LED - curled endcaps
Juki TL-2010Q COB LED – curled endcaps

Fortunately, those delicate potato chips lived to tell the tale and, after a few design iterations, everything came out right:

Juki TL-2010Q COB LED - heatsink endcap - internal connections
Juki TL-2010Q COB LED – heatsink endcap – internal connections

The “connector”, such as it is, serves to make the light bar testable / removable and the ballast resistor tweakable, without going nuts over the details. The left side is an ordinary pin header strip held in place with hot melt glue atop the obligatory Kapton tape, because the heatsink doesn’t get hot enough to bother the glue. The right side is a pair of two-pin header sockets, also intended for PCB use. The incoming power connects to one set and the ballast resistor to the other, thusly:

Juki TL-2010Q COB LED - light bar connector diagram
Juki TL-2010Q COB LED – light bar connector diagram

The diagram is flipped top-to-bottom from the picture, but you get the idea. Quick, easy, durable, and butt-ugly, I’d say.

The next step was to mount it on the sewing machine and steal some power, but that’s a story for another day.

The relevant dimensions for the aluminum extrusion:

Aluminum shelf bracket extrusion - dimensions
Aluminum shelf bracket extrusion – dimensions

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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Vacuum Tube LEDs: Radome Prototype

Definitely not a vacuum tube:

Arduino Pro Mini - NP-BX1 cell - SK6812 - blue phase
Arduino Pro Mini – NP-BX1 cell – SK6812 – blue phase

It’s running the same firmware, though, with the Arduino Pro Mini and the LEDs drawing power from the (mostly) defunct lithium battery.

The LED holder is identical to the Pirhana holder, with a 10 mm diameter recess punched into it for the SK6812 PCB:

Astable Multivibrator Battery Holder - Neopixel PCB - Slic3r
Astable Multivibrator Battery Holder – Neopixel PCB – Slic3r

Those embossed legends sit in debossed rectangles for improved legibility. If I repeat it often enough, I’m sure I’ll remember which is which.

The 3.6 V (and declining) power supply may not produce as much light from the SK6812 LEDs, but it’s entirely adequate for anything other than a well-lit room. The 28 AWG silicone wires require a bit of careful dressing to emerge from the holes in the radome holder:

SK6812 LED PCB - Pirhana holder wiring
SK6812 LED PCB – Pirhana holder wiring

The firmware cycles through all the usual colors:

Arduino Pro Mini - NP-BX1 cell - SK6812 - orange phase
Arduino Pro Mini – NP-BX1 cell – SK6812 – orange phase

A pair of tensilized 22 AWG copper wires support the Pro Mini between the rear struts. The whole affair looks a bit heavier than I expected, though, so I should reduce the spider to a single pair of legs with a third hole in the bottom of the LED recess for the data wire.

The OpenSCAD source code needs some refactoring and tweaking, but the Pirhana LED solid model version of the battery holder should give you the general idea.

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Astable Multivibrator: Monochrome Pirhana LED

The LED parts box disgorged some single-color Pirhana-style LEDs:

Astable - 2N7000 - Mono Pirhana LED
Astable – 2N7000 – Mono Pirhana LED

Didn’t quite catch the blink, but the Ping-Pong ball radome lights up just as you’d expect.

The radome sits on a stripped-down RGB LED spider:

Astable Multivibrator Battery Holder - mono LED Spider - fit view
Astable Multivibrator Battery Holder – mono LED Spider – fit view

The circuitry is the same as the First Light version, with a 1 MΩ resistor stabilizing the LED ballast resistor:

Astable - 2N7000 - Mono Pirhana LED - detail
Astable – 2N7000 – Mono Pirhana LED – detail

Those are 1 µF ceramic caps in the astable section, so I’m no longer abusing electrolytics, and a stylin’ 100 nF film cap metering out the LED pulse up above.

Just for pretty, I’ve been using yellow / black wires for the battery connections and matching the LED color with its cathode lead.

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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