Alead Telecoil Receiver: Magnetic Field Check

I got an Alead / Nolan HearLinks (many adjectives) Telecoil receiver to boost my ability to hear music & presentations at Vassar, because they recently slotted telecoil loops into the floors of their public venues. It took a few concerts to get the appropriate volume setting, after which I wondered how sensitive the receiver was:

Alead T-coil receiver - test setup
Alead T-coil receiver – test setup

The small T in the upper right corner marks the receiving coil location, with the coil oriented parallel to the body’s long axis. It’s the secondary winding of an air-core transformer with a single-turn (perhaps using Litz wire) primary embedded in the floor, with the induced voltage obeying the usual transformer equation:

V = 2π µ₀ µr N A f H cos θ

Definitions:

  • µ₀ – vacuum permeability = 4π×10-7 H/m
  • µr – relative permeability
  • N – number of turns
  • A – receiver loop area, m²
  • f – signal frequency, Hz
  • H – magnetomotive force, A/m
  • θ – angle between windings

For a given installation and receiver position, pretty much everything is fixed, with the voltage depending only on the H field caused by the primary winding current.

The induced voltage is linearly dependent on the frequency, but the transmitter equalization filters apparently flatten the spectrum to get equal receiver amplitude between about 100 Hz and 5 kHz.

The coil in that picture has nine turns, with four passing through the Tek current probe. Applying 10 mVpp to the winding produces a corresponding current:

JDS6600 10mVpp 1 kHz - 4 turns - 1 mA-div
JDS6600 10mVpp 1 kHz – 4 turns – 1 mA-div

The scope sees 14 mVpp = 1.4 div at 1 mA/div = 1.4 mA. Dividing by 4 turns means the coil actually carryes 350 µA. The signal generator has a 50 Ω output impedance, so 10 mV should produce about 200 µA, which seems a bit low. On the other paw, the signal generator sees the coil as a dead short at 1 kHz, so I don’t trust the numbers.

Whatever magnetic flux it may be produces a 1 kHz tone at a somewhat higher volume (for the same receiver setting) than the fancy Vassar loops, so the flux is in the right ballpark. With a bit more attention to detail, perhaps I can tinker up a current-mode loop drive amplifier.

The Alead receiver has an internally generated tick audible at the audio volume I need for the Vassar loops, which is 5 to 7 steps down from the maximum volume at 15 steps. It seems related to the internal Bluetooth hardware, although it’s present even when the receiver is not paired with my Pixel phone and, in fact, is unchanged even when 100 feet from the nearest electronic device.

When I reported the problem, they said:

Yes, you can hear very minor tick sound on telecoil mode. It is caused by some electronic and current to make those tick sound. Sorry for this defective on the design.

It had one job that it doesn’t do well, so it’s on the way back for a refund.

Evidently, I must build an audio loop receiver to get what I want …

,

  1. #1 by Vedran on 2019-10-04 - 11:29

    Evidently, I must build an audio loop receiver to get what I want …
    That is what got me into machining, fiberglass repair and many other hobbies. Want it done right, gotta do it yourself… usually twice… which kind of explains the first part :)

    • #2 by Ed on 2019-10-04 - 13:49

      Aye! The end result may not look as polished, but I’ll understand how it works and what it does.

      Besides, doing it twice counts as practice!

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