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Monthly Science: Supermoon Eclipse

Lunar eclipses happens so rarely it’s worth going outdoors into the dark:

Supermoon eclipse 2015-09-27 2250 - ISO 125 2 s

Supermoon eclipse 2015-09-27 2250 – ISO 125 2 s

That’s at the camera’s automatic ISO 125 setting. Forcing the camera to ISO 1000 boosts the grain and brings out the stars to show just how fast the universe rotates around the earth…

One second:

Supermoon eclipse 2015-09-27 2308 - ISO 1000 1 s

Supermoon eclipse 2015-09-27 2308 – ISO 1000 1 s

Two seconds:

Supermoon eclipse 2015-09-27 2308 - ISO 1000 2 s

Supermoon eclipse 2015-09-27 2308 – ISO 1000 2 s

Four seconds:

Supermoon eclipse 2015-09-27 2308 - ISO 1000 4 s

Supermoon eclipse 2015-09-27 2308 – ISO 1000 4 s

Taken with the Sony DSC-H5 and the 1.7 teleadapter atop an ordinary camera tripod, full manual mode, wide open aperture at f/3.5, infinity focus, zoomed to the optical limit, 2 second shutter delay. Worked surprisingly well, all things considered.

Mad props to the folks who worked out orbital mechanics from first principles, based on observations with state-of-the-art hardware consisting of dials and pointers and small glass, in a time when religion claimed the answers and brooked no competition.

NASA takes much better moon pix, plus a bonus ISS transit, during the previous full moon:

ISS Moon Transit - 2015-08-02 - NASA 19599509214_68eb2ae39f_o

ISS Moon Transit – 2015-08-02 – NASA 19599509214_68eb2ae39f_o

The next eclipse tetrad starting in 2032 won’t be visible from North America and, alas, we surely won’t be around for the ones after that. Astronomy introduces you to deep time and deep space.

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  1. #1 by rkward on 2015-10-01 - 08:09

    Thank for the posting of the pics Ed. Nice to see them since nearly every celestial event results in cloudy skies for Ohio.

    • #2 by Ed on 2015-10-01 - 08:55

      If astronomy didn’t require staying up past my bedtime, I’d be more in favor of DIYing it!

      A long time ago, in a state far away, when our Larval Engineer was smaller, she helped build a projector that let us watch the sun turn into a crescent. Solar eclipses, those I can handle…

  2. #3 by Red County Pete on 2015-10-01 - 10:54

    The eclipse was near full strength at moonrise in Deepest Oregon. (Clear skies, for the first lunar eclipse in a while) Very strange looking for a dim red glow in the trees to locate the moon. I’ve got pics from a lunar eclipse in 1975–most horribly overexposed, or blurred. Hard to get it right with film…