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Snow Mounds Redux

A few more weekly snowstorms refreshed the patio tables mounds:

Snow mound - round table - 2015-02-22

Snow mound – round table – 2015-02-22

The spire under the square table nearly reached the cross brace:

Snow mound - square table - 2015-02-22

Snow mound – square table – 2015-02-22

That spire comes from snow falling straight down through the table, with a bit collecting on the struts:

Snow pillar - square table - 2015-02-22

Snow pillar – square table – 2015-02-22

Holding the camera over the table shows a thin glass rim around the edge of the hole:

Snow cauldron - square table - 2015-02-22

Snow cauldron – square table – 2015-02-22

I wouldn’t believe it, either, if I hadn’t seen it!

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  1. #1 by rkward on 2015-03-07 - 12:02

    Very cool capture. I’ll be this could be simulated in software too. I think you mentioned this in the previous post, but I would also love to hear a physicist’s or mathematician’s explanation of why this occurs. Actually, now that I think of it, I have just the guys to send it to. We’ll see what happens.

    • #2 by Ed on 2015-03-07 - 12:14

      This will certainly require some meter sticks next winter…

  2. #3 by Red County Pete on 2015-03-07 - 22:16

    meter sticks

    Vernier calipers would work out here. [sigh] OTOH, even though we’re getting mornings around 18F, we still got up into the mid-’60s in the afternoon. (Amazing what living arid climate does for temp swings.) Julie had me re-install the outdoor clothes-dryer, and she was able to use it three days running. The water collection system is ready, in case we get lucky.

    We’re expecting yet another nasty fire season. I saw enough very heavy tankers and helicopter dumps last year, thank you. (One of the noteworthy fires was about 4 miles away, just behind a hill. Mercifully, the wind was in a favorable direction, and the pastures weren’t going to burn that badly.)

    I’m amazed that the snow flowed so well through the hole, and it didn’t get closed off by winds or clumps. Stick that in a dictionary under Angle of Repose.

    • #4 by Ed on 2015-03-08 - 08:27

      Stock up on big hoses and wide-angle nozzles, although it sure sounds like you won’t have a full tank when you need it most. May the wind be always in your favor, as the saying goes…

      • #5 by Red County Pete on 2015-03-08 - 09:52

        Done and done, and I have two IBC tanks in the barn. That’s about 1250 gallons with the fire trailer. We’re doing spring cleanup of cones and needles and such. We’re fairly well set, unless things get really bad. OTOH, some of the neighboring property is spooky…