Clymene Moth

The first Clymene Moth we ever saw:

Clymene Moth
Clymene Moth

It’s a poor picture, but the moth was up and away after that; as always, the poor picture you get is better than the great picture you might have gotten.

A few days later, we spotted two of them on a brick wall, so there must be a bunch more out there.

4 thoughts on “Clymene Moth

  1. Interesting, never saw one of these. However, you wrote in https://softsolder.com/2012/08/18/aphids-on-milkweed/ that you have milkweed to attract and support Monarchs which have become under great threat. See http://www.capecodonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20140227/NEWS/402270325/-1/news01. Have you seen any this year? I’ve been lucky to see two, others have seen none at all. Your comments on Monarchs would be most welcome especially if you can promote the growth of milkweed among your followers.

    1. We have a fine stand of milkweed out back that hosted nary a Monarch this year. Mary reports just two adults: one passing over Vassar Farms and the other at Stony Kill.

      Perhaps we should spread milkweed seeds along our usual bicycle routes …

  2. You get nicer looking moths than us. The Pandora moth (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pandora_Pinemoth) is the resident champion for big. Dumb and ugly, too. Some years, we’ll get a bunch and it’s egg masses all over.

    Monterey, CA has a grove near town where Monarchs overwinter. I thought I’ve seen some over here, but according to the Wiki articles, they are Viceroys, and only a very few of them in the 11 years we’ve been here.

    1. nicer looking moths

      A long, long time ago, we found an immense chrysalis and put it in the kitchen, where it eventually emitted a gorgeous female Luna Moth. It flew off while we weren’t watching and pasted unfertilized eggs all over the furniture before reappearing.

      Haven’t seen one since, but we’ve promised to release it into the wild…

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