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Archive for category Recumbent Bicycling

A Bounteous Tobacco Harvest

Spotted on a utility ride to a local shop:

Shops at South Hills - planter butt collection
Shops at South Hills – planter butt collection

We decided an employee of the adjacent “nail spa” has been making the best of a bad situation.

If it was easy to quit, there’d surely still be a few smokers …

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Dutchess Rail Trail: Access Gate Control

Five different agencies can drive through the Dutchess Rail Trail’s Overocker Rd trailhead vehicle gate:

Dutchess Rail Trail - Overocker Rd ruts
Dutchess Rail Trail – Overocker Rd ruts

Well, four of them can, because whoever snapped the barely visible small lock around the long-shackle lock (horizontal, to the right) is SOL:

Dutchess Rail Trail - Vehicle Gate Locks at Overocker Rd
Dutchess Rail Trail – Vehicle Gate Locks at Overocker Rd

Perhaps they’re from the DC W&WWA?

The last time we rode past the Diddel Rd trailhead, there were zero locks on the (unchained) vehicle gate; evidently somebody forgot to relock the gate on the way out.

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Turtles!

Spotted in Lake Walton on an out-and-back ride to the Hopewell Junction Depot end of the rail trail:

Turtles - Lake Walton - 2019-03-14
Turtles – Lake Walton – 2019-03-14

Mary counted & guesstimated fifty turtles in the backwater.

They’re the snuggliest turtles I’ve ever seen:

Turtles snuggling - Lake Walton - 2019-03-14
Turtles snuggling – Lake Walton – 2019-03-14

Taken with the Pixel XL at maximum zoom, hence the gritty overpixelization.

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Tour Easy: SRAM Grip Bushing

After installing the X.0 shifter, I sprang for new grips:

Tour Easy - SRAM X.0 grip shifter - new grip with bushing
Tour Easy – SRAM X.0 grip shifter – new grip with bushing

They’re 90 mm long, which turned out to be 4 mm shorter than the grips that came with the bike; a close look showed the original ones were cut down from SRAM’s 110 mm grips.

Well, I can fix that:

Tour Easy - SRAM grip bushings
Tour Easy – SRAM grip bushings

Ordinarily, you’d just move the brake levers by 4 mm and declare victory. In this case, moving the right lever would be easy, but the left one is firmly glued in place by the radio’s PTT button:

PTT Button - rounded cap
PTT Button – rounded cap

Believe me, solid modeling is easy compared to redoing that!

The OpenSCAD source code doesn’t amount to much:

// SRAM grip shifter bushings
// Ed Nisley KE4ZNU March 2019

Protrusion = 0.1;           // make holes end cleanly

//----------------------
// Dimensions

ID = 0;
OD = 1;
LENGTH = 2;

Bushing = [22.2 + 0.5,31.0,4.0];        // ID = E-Z slip fit

NumSides = 2*3*4;

//----------------------
// Build it!

difference() {
  cylinder(d=Bushing[OD],h=Bushing[LENGTH],$fn=NumSides);
  translate([0,0,-Protrusion])
    cylinder(d=Bushing[ID],h=Bushing[LENGTH] + 2*Protrusion,$fn=NumSides);
}

I loves me my 3D printer …

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Tour Easy: SRAM X.0 Rear Grip Shifter

With more snow on the schedule, Mary’s bike finally got a new rear shifter:

Tour Easy - SRAM X.0 grip shifter installed
Tour Easy – SRAM X.0 grip shifter installed

It’s an old-school SRAM X.0 grip shifter, evidently compatible with SRAM X.9 and X.7 derailleurs, and seems to work OK. The wavy ridges may be more prominent than necessary for our road riding, though.

In a miracle of rare device, the preinstalled cable turned out to be exactly long enough:

Tour Easy - SRAM X.0 cable length
Tour Easy – SRAM X.0 cable length

Twiddling the length for perfect shifting requires on-the-road testing and the chain wrap may need tweaking (I may not have gotten it right when I installed the derailleur), but at least the shifter stops at every detent along the way.

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SJCAM M20 Camera: Tour Easy Seat Mount

The general idea is to replace this:

M20 in waterproof case - Tour Easy seat
M20 in waterproof case – Tour Easy seat

With this:

SJCAM M20 Mount - Tour Easy side view
SJCAM M20 Mount – Tour Easy side view

Thereby solving two problems:

  • Pitifully small battery capacity
  • Wobbly camera support

The battery is an Anker PowerCore 13000 Power Bank plugged into the M20’s USB port. Given that SJCAM’s 1 A·h batteries barely lasted for a typical hour of riding, the 13 A·h PowerCore will definitely outlast my legs. The four blue dots just ahead of the strap around the battery show it’s fully charged and the blue light glowing through the case around the M20 indicates it’s turned on.

The solid model has four parts:

SJCAM M20 Mount - Fit layout
SJCAM M20 Mount – Fit layout

Which, as always, incorporates improvements based on the actual hardware on the bike.

A strap-and-buckle belt harvested from a defunct water pack holds the battery into the cradle and the cradle onto the rack, with a fuzzy velcro strip stuck to the bottom to prevent sliding:

SJCAM M20 Mount - Tour Easy rear view
SJCAM M20 Mount – Tour Easy rear view

The shell around the camera is basically a box minus the camera:

SJCAM M20 Mount - Show - shell
SJCAM M20 Mount – Show – shell

The shell builds as three separate slabs, with the center section having cutouts ahead of the camera’s projections to let it slide into place:

SJCAM M20 Mount - Show - shell sections
SJCAM M20 Mount – Show – shell sections

The new shell version is 30.5 mm thick, so a 40 mm screw will stick out maybe 5 mm beyond the nylon locknut. I trust the screws will get lost in the visual noise of the bike.

A peg sticking out behind the USB jack anchors the cable in place:

SJCAM M20 Mount - Show - shell sections - USB side
SJCAM M20 Mount – Show – shell sections – USB side

The front slab and center top have curves matching the M20 case:

SJCAM M20 Mount - Show - shell sections - button side
SJCAM M20 Mount – Show – shell sections – button side

The camera model has a tidy presentation option:

SJCAM M20 Mount - Show - M20 body
SJCAM M20 Mount – Show – M20 body

And an ugly option to knock the protruberances out of the shell:

SJCAM M20 Mount - Show - M20 body - knockouts
SJCAM M20 Mount – Show – M20 body – knockouts

The square-ish post on the base fits into an angled socket in the clamp around the seat rail:

SJCAM M20 Mount - Show - clamp
SJCAM M20 Mount – Show – clamp

The numbers correspond to the “Look Angle” of the socket pointing the camera toward overtaking traffic. The -20° in the first clamp shows a bit too much rack:

SJCAM M20 Mount - first ride - traffic - 2019-02-06
SJCAM M20 Mount – first ride – traffic – 2019-02-06

It may not matter, though, as sometimes you want to remember what’s on the right:

SJCAM M20 Mount - first ride - 2019-02-06
SJCAM M20 Mount – first ride – 2019-02-06

FWIW, the track veering off onto the grass came from a fat-tire bike a few days earlier. Most of the rail trail had cleared by the time we tried it, with some ice and snow in rock cuts and shaded areas.

Contrary to the first picture, I later remounted the camera under the seat rail with its top side downward. The M20 has a “rotate video” mode for exactly that situation, which I forgot to turn off in the fancy new mount, so I rotated the pix afterward.

A 3 mm screw extends upward through the hole in the socket to meet a threaded brass insert epoxied into the shell base, as shown in the uglified M20 model. Despite appearances, the hole is perpendicular to both the socket and the shell, so you can tweak the Look Angle without reprinting the shell.

All in all, the mount works well. We await better riding weather …

The OpenSCAD source code as a GitHub Gist:

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NP-BX1 Lithium Batteries: DOT-01

A quartet of DOT01 NP-BX1 batteries arrived:

Dot01 NP-BX1 - new 2019-02
Dot01 NP-BX1 – new 2019-02

The dotted lines show the results from late 2015 for a pair of then-new Wasabi NP-BX1 batteries, so the DOT-01 batteries look about the same. The F battery barely lasted to the halfway point of our most recent bike ride and the G battery now resides in the blinky-and-glowy pile.

I’d be unsurprised to discover all the myraid “different” NP-BX1 batteries all come from the same factory. Unlike the Wasabi batteries, these lack date codes, which seems like an extra-cost option you don’t get on the low end.

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