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Computer Bug: Arachnid Division

They’re everywhere:

Spider in Optiplex 760

Spider in Optiplex 760

Found it while shuffling video cards…

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  1. #1 by rkward on 2015-01-17 - 09:06

    Just staying warm!

  2. #2 by Red County Pete on 2015-01-17 - 11:20

    I’d name it Grace. [grin]

    • #3 by Ed on 2015-01-17 - 17:05

      Well played, sir!

  3. #4 by david on 2015-01-17 - 16:14

    I wonder when they’ll stop bothering to silkscreen component identifiers… it’s not like anybody is actually going to repair such a board (even the likes of us), and the pick-and-place doesn’t need them…

    • #5 by Ed on 2015-01-17 - 17:05

      Good question. They’d look so … barren … without a silkscreen; maybe it’s a comfort thing.

    • #6 by Jason Doege on 2015-01-18 - 01:02

      Probably about when they can produce error-free designs. These things still need to be debugged before they are turned into products. I wonder if board houses would charge less to remove the silk-screen step some time after volume production has started.

      • #7 by Red County Pete on 2015-01-18 - 09:45

        Beyond that, once the debugged board gets into production, the board shop would need to have some way to ID the board. They’d still want silkscreen (laser marking is possible, but another set of headaches) to have the particulars of the board (ID, revision, and such), and the variable cost of leaving the component information in place is minor, probably less than the cost to create a bare-bones silkscreen layer..

        Besides, there’s probably a tiny bit of hand work when the normal process has a glitch. You don’t want to tick off the people who handle rework. [Damn, I can still speak product engineer!]