Laser-cut Plywood Can Rack

On occasion I will do something practical:

Salmon can storage boxes
Salmon can storage boxes

It’s not that we needed a rack for those cans, but it did get a laugh from Mary and that’s what counts.

The magic URL encoding all the parameters to generate a rack, using a recent addition to the wonderful boxes.py collection:

https://www.festi.info/boxes.py/CanStorage?FingerJoint_angle=90.0&FingerJoint_style=rectangular&FingerJoint_surroundingspaces=0.0&FingerJoint_edge_width=1.0&FingerJoint_extra_length=0.0&FingerJoint_finger=2.0&FingerJoint_play=0.0&FingerJoint_space=2.0&FingerJoint_width=1.0&Stackable_angle=60&Stackable_height=2.0&Stackable_holedistance=1.0&Stackable_width=4.0&fillHoles_bar_length=50&fillHoles_fill_pattern=no+fill&fillHoles_hole_max_radius=15&fillHoles_hole_min_radius=5&fillHoles_hole_style=hexagon&fillHoles_max_random=1000&fillHoles_space_between_holes=10.0&fillHoles_space_to_border=15.0&top_edge=%C5%A0&bottom_edge=%C5%A1&canDiameter=80&canHight=115&canNum=6&chuteAngle=5.0&thickness=3.2&format=svg&tabs=0&debug=0&labels=0&labels=1&reference=0&inner_corners=loop&burn=0.04&render=0

In order from left to right, the three successive racks represent:

  • A good laugh
  • Finding that a burn correction parameter of 0.04 produces a much better fit than 0.05.
  • Discovering that I must orient finger joints along the same axis to minimize small axis scale errors errors

The Burn Correction Factor encapsulates many physical effects and, much like 3D printing’s Extrusion Multiplier, must be determined empirically.

The axis scale error, however, took me by surprise.The X axis travels on the order of 0.2 mm more along 250 mm, about 0.08%, than the Y axis, even after my tedious calibration. I must do that calibration again, because, as Miss Clavel observed in a different context, Something Is Not Right.

And, yes, that tiny difference is enough to misalign the last few fingers with their holes, to the extent of requiring somewhat more than Gentle Persuasion with a plastic mallet.

11 thoughts on “Laser-cut Plywood Can Rack

  1. I assume the rack is the fancy kind that helps with stock rotation by having the top row drop down at the back.

    1. I wouldn’t have it any other way! There’s now a handwrittenscrawled tag saying “Use First!” on the leftmost rack.

      Turns out the cans are slightly conical and require alternate direction stacking for ahem successful operation. Details, details …

  2. I had completely forgotten about the canned salmon casseroles topped with tomato puree my mom used to make when I was a kid. Thanks for ruining my weekend ;)

    1. IMO canned salmon is the most revolting stuff in the kitchen. Mary puts it on her garden-salad-ish lunch, but we have reached an agreement about putting it in anything else.

  3. Julie makes fish cakes with canned salmon. She normally used bread crumbs (gluten free because allergies), but we dehydrated some of this year’s zucchini crop. The zucchini improves the taste, for various values of taste.

    Once a month, we get out the Foreman grill and a couple pieces of salmon from the restaurant supply stash. Makes up for the fish cakes.

    And yeah, the brand of salmon we use is different, but also the conical can. I’m sure there’s a reason, but I’n not sure I want to know. [grin]

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