Archive for December, 2019

Cheese Slicer: JB Weld Epoxy FTW

The JB Weld epoxy I slathered on our trusty hand-held cheese slicer a year ago continues to withstand daily washing and occasional trips through the dishwasher:

Cheese Slicer JB Weld 1 year - top
Cheese Slicer JB Weld 1 year – top

The bottom is in fine shape, too:

Cheese Slicer JB Weld 1 year - bottom
Cheese Slicer JB Weld 1 year – bottom

Compare it with XTC-3D epoxy, which admittedly isn’t rated for continuous water exposure, after a year:

Cheese Slicer - epoxy coating split
Cheese Slicer – epoxy coating split

JB Weld FTW!

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Monthly Image: CD Diffraction

Just to see how it worked, I engraved the Tek Circuit Computer scales on scrap CDs:

CNC 3018-Pro - front overview
CNC 3018-Pro – front overview

At first, I hadn’t correctly scaled the text paths, but the diffraction patterns caught my eye:

Tek CC on CD - bottom - unscaled text
Tek CC on CD – bottom – unscaled text

The illumination comes from two “daylight” T8 LED tubes in a shoplight fixture, running left-to-right, so it seems I held the camera rotated 1/4 turn in landscape mode. The pix look OK either way.

Bottom deck:

Tek CC on CD - bottom
Tek CC on CD – bottom

Middle deck:

Tek CC on CD - middle
Tek CC on CD – middle

Top deck, with the camera held portrait-style:

Tek CC on CD - top
Tek CC on CD – top

I’m a sucker for diffraction patterns …

The tiny engravings don’t photograph well, because they’re floating atop the transparent disc and the rainbow patterns from the data layer, but they still come out OK even when scaled to fit on a hard drive platter:

Tek CC - bottom deck - scaled to HD platter
Tek CC – bottom deck – scaled to HD platter

Looking good!

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eBay Drop-Ship Addressing

So I bought some LM12UU linear bearings from a nominally US-based eBay seller and received a suitably marked bag:

eBay - LM8UU bearings in LM12UU bag
eBay – LM8UU bearings in LM12UU bag

They looked a bit on the skinny side:

eBay - LM8UU bearing
eBay – LM8UU bearing

It seems somebody in the supply chain wasn’t paying attention, which isn’t surprising given the its ability to deliver ten hunks of reasonably precise machining to my mailbox for a buck-and-a-half apiece.

As it happens, I already have far too many LM8UU bearings and, after some unavailing back-and-forth with the seller, eBay customer service determined neither of us was “at fault” and refunded the whole order.

Being in no particular hurry, I ordered the next lot from halfway around the planet. Apparently, I’m now known throughout the land:

eBay - drop-ship addressing
eBay – drop-ship addressing

Another label atop that one sported my actual address, with a matching Orange Connex tracking number barcode. Turns out OC is a “a joint venture between a leader in Chinese private equity investment, CITI CPE, and the a [sic] pioneer of global e-commerce platform, ebay”.

AFAICT, containers of “direct from China” packages arrive in the belly of a cargo airplane, get a sticker with their final destination, and enter the US postal system. It’s not clear buying from a “US seller” changes anything, as many of those packages come from addresses matching a building next to an airport.

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Mini-Lathe, Maxi-OD

This came about while tinkering up a shade for a repurposed LED downlight:

PVC fitting - boring setup
PVC fitting – boring setup

It’s a 4 inch DWV pipe coupling I bored out to fit the LED housing, which was ever so slightly larger than the pipe OD.

Cutting it off required as much workspace as the poor little lathe had:

PVC fitting - cutoff setup
PVC fitting – cutoff setup

Ignore the toolpost handle across the top. What’s important: the cutoff blade poking out of the QCTP, above the orange carriage stop lock lever, extending just far enough to cut through the coupling’s wall before the compound hits the coupling. The compound slide is all the way out against the cross-slide DRO, rotated at the only angle putting the tool where it needs to be and clearing the end of the coupling.

It ended reasonably well:

PVC fitting - LED floor lamp
PVC fitting – LED floor lamp

But, in retrospect, was hideously bad practice. Next time, I’ll make a fixture to hold the fitting on a faceplate.

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MPCNC Drag Knife Holder: Showing More Blade

Attempting to cut laminated cardstock decks for the Homage Tektronix Circuit Computer required a bit more blade extension than my LM12UU holder made available:

Drag Knife - LM12UU ground shaft - assembled
Drag Knife – LM12UU ground shaft – assembled

Shortening the 12 mm shaft wasn’t going to happen, so I knocked a little bit off the blade holder to give the knurled lock ring slightly more travel:

Drag Knife Holder - shortening stop
Drag Knife Holder – shortening stop

The lathe cutoff blade is a bit to the right of the new cut, but you get the general idea: not a whole lot of clearance in there.

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Mini-Lathe DRO Battery Life

The Mini-Lathe DROs eat a 390 alkaline coin cell a year, more or less:

Mini-Lathe DRO - battery life
Mini-Lathe DRO – battery life

The other DRO’s cell was 10 mV higher, so it might have survived another few weeks. I’ll call it a year, as the OEM cells failed half a year after I got the thing and these are the second set.

The last time I did this, I wedged a thin foam sheet below the display PCB to put a bit more pressure on the (+) contact tab sticking down from the middle of the plate:

Mini-Lathe DRO - battery compartment
Mini-Lathe DRO – battery compartment

The (-) contact is a pad on the PCB below the battery compartment. The glaring metal reflector is part of the curved cell retainer.

I still wish the DROs didn’t collide with the compound slide, but you can get used to anything if you do it long enough.

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Huion H610Pro (V2) Tablet vs. Ubuntu 18.04

Given the hassle involved with getting my ancient Wacom Graphire3 tablet working with various Linux versions, I was unsurprised to find a Huion H610Pro (V2) tablet (*) didn’t quite work out of the box.

Good old lsusb showed the tablet’s USB info:

lsusb
Bus 002 Device 002: ID 8087:0024 Intel Corp. Integrated Rate Matching Hub
Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
Bus 001 Device 004: ID 248a:ff0f  
Bus 001 Device 007: ID 058f:9410 Alcor Micro Corp. Keyboard
Bus 001 Device 006: ID 047d:1020 Kensington Expert Mouse Trackball
Bus 001 Device 005: ID 046d:c508 Logitech, Inc. Cordless Trackball
Bus 001 Device 003: ID 0451:2046 Texas Instruments, Inc. TUSB2046 Hub
Bus 001 Device 002: ID 8087:0024 Intel Corp. Integrated Rate Matching Hub
Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
Bus 004 Device 006: ID 05e3:0748 Genesys Logic, Inc. 
Bus 004 Device 005: ID 0480:a202 Toshiba America Inc Canvio Basics HDD
Bus 004 Device 004: ID 0bda:0411 Realtek Semiconductor Corp. 
Bus 004 Device 003: ID 0451:8041 Texas Instruments, Inc. 
Bus 004 Device 002: ID 0bda:0411 Realtek Semiconductor Corp. 
Bus 004 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0003 Linux Foundation 3.0 root hub
Bus 003 Device 006: ID 256c:006d  
Bus 003 Device 004: ID 0bda:5411 Realtek Semiconductor Corp. 
Bus 003 Device 003: ID 0451:8043 Texas Instruments, Inc. 
Bus 003 Device 002: ID 0bda:5411 Realtek Semiconductor Corp. 
Bus 003 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub

Yes, the space normally occupied by the product description is blank. The first blank description comes from a generic wireless keypad’s USB receiver; the 0x248a Vendor ID claims be Maxxter, a step down from the usual Logitech ID rip, and its 0xff0f Device ID looks bogus to me, too.

The 0x256c Vendor ID isn’t in the online databases yet, but some grepping found it in /lib/udev/rules.d/65-libwacom.rules:

# Huion H610 Pro
ENV{ID_BUS}=="usb", ENV{ID_VENDOR_ID}=="256c", ENV{ID_MODEL_ID}=="006e",  ENV{ID_INPUT}="1", ENV{ID_INPUT_JOYSTICK}="", ENV{ID_INPUT_TABLET}="1"
ATTRS{name}=="* Pad", ENV{ID_BUS}=="usb", ENV{ID_VENDOR_ID}=="256c", ENV{ID_MODEL_ID}=="006e",  ENV{ID_INPUT_TABLET_PAD}="1"
# Huion H610 Pro
ENV{ID_BUS}=="usb", ENV{ID_VENDOR_ID}=="256c", ENV{ID_MODEL_ID}=="006e",  ENV{ID_INPUT}="1", ENV{ID_INPUT_JOYSTICK}="", ENV{ID_INPUT_TABLET}="1"
ATTRS{name}=="* Pad", ENV{ID_BUS}=="usb", ENV{ID_VENDOR_ID}=="256c", ENV{ID_MODEL_ID}=="006e",  ENV{ID_INPUT_TABLET_PAD}="1"

Note, however, that the Device ID is 0x006e, where the upgraded V2 tablet is 0x006d; I have no idea why the number goes down as the version goes up. Change all instances of the former to the latter.

Even though the Wacom driver can apparently handle the older H610Pro, the V2 tablet’s buttons were missing in action.

The solution seems come from the Digimend project, although it also expects the 0x006e Device ID, and as is usually the case, installing the latest & greatest version, hot from GitHub, did the trick.

For this first pass, I didn’t use DKMS, which this post will remind me to do after the next kernel upgrade.

A reboot settled all the drivers into place, after which:

xsetwacom --list
HUION Huion Tablet Pen stylus   	id: 10	type: STYLUS    
HUION Huion Tablet Pad pad      	id: 11	type: PAD 

Yes, it’s “Tablet Pad pad” and capitalization is important.

For my simple needs, confining the stylus cursor to the landscape monitor makes sense. Adding this to ~/.config/startup.sh did the same thing as similar invocations for the Wacom:

xsetwacom --verbose set "HUION Huion Tablet Pen stylus" MapToOutput "DP-1"

The various buttons still need configuration, although that’s in the nature of fine tuning. The top three buttons are 1, 2, 3, with the rest tagging along at 8 through 12. They take trendy gray-on-black labeling to an absurd limit:

Huion H610Pro V2 - embedded gray-on-black buttons
Huion H610Pro V2 – embedded gray-on-black buttons

That’s with intense overhead lighting shining into the buttons and lighting up the lower-surface iconography. In normal light, they’re shiny black disks with invisible legends and, no, they’re not backlit.

The overall button-tweaking syntax:

xsetwacom set "HUION Huion Tablet Pad pad" button 12 key whatever

Where whatever comes from the list in /usr/include/X11/keysymdef.h, per the doc in man xsetwacom and a list of possibilities from:

xsetwacom --list modifiers  "HUION Huion Tablet Pad pad"

For example, this causes the bottom button to spit out a question mark:

xsetwacom set "HUION Huion Tablet Pad pad" button 12 key shift /

It’s not obvious changing the buttons from their default button numbers to anything else makes any sense; just tweaking individual programs to map those numbers into useful actions should work better.

(*) It has a “battery-free” stylus which, to my way of thinking, is a major selling point.

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