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Archive for December 6th, 2017

MPCNC: Epoxy-Coated Endstop Switches

Using 3D printer style endstop switches has the advantage of putting low-pass filters (i.e. caps) at the switches, plus adding LED blinkiness, but it does leave the +5 V and Gnd conductors hanging out in the breeze. After mulling over various enclosures, it occured to me I could just entomb the things in epoxy and be done with it.

The first step was to get rid of the PCB mounting screws and use 3M permanent foam tape:

MPCNC - Epoxy-coated Endstop - Adhesive Tape

MPCNC – Epoxy-coated Endstop – Adhesive Tape

Get all the switches set up and level, mix up 2.8 g of XTC-3D (because I haveĀ way too much), and dab it on the switches until all the exposed conductors have at least a thin coat:

MPCNC - Epoxy-coated Endstop - Installed

MPCNC – Epoxy-coated Endstop – Installed

You should use a bit more care than I: the epoxy can creep around the corner of the switch and immobilize the actuator in its relaxed position. Some deft X-Acto knife work solved the problem, but only after firmly smashing the X axis against the nonfunctional switch.

Epoxy isn’t a particularly good encapsulant, because it cures hard and tends to crack components off the board during temperature extremes. These boards live in the basement, cost under a buck, and I have plenty of spares, so let’s see what happens.

At least it’s now somewhat more difficult to apply a dead short across the Arduino’s power supply, which comes directly from a Raspberry Pi’s USB port.

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