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Archive for September 21st, 2010

New Theme?

There’s no way to tell if a theme will actually look right without enabling it and investing an hour fiddling with the options.

That’s why it looks different with each refresh…

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Comfy Office Desk Chair

Chair from auto seat

Chair from auto seat

Most office desk chairs are crap. Spend a couple of hours in a typical office chair and you wonder if it had been designed by aliens who, perhaps, read the specs for human beings, but never actually met a person in the flesh.

Conversely, you can drive for a couple of hours and get out of the car feeling at least OK. (Well, if you buy a decent car, that is. Last rental car I drove had terrible seats.)

Anyway, you can buy an office chair made from a car seat, but they seem staggeringly expensive for what you get.

So, a couple of decades ago, I went to a junkyard and picked up a nice seat from a fancy wreck for about $50, built a plywood base with six casters from Home Depot, put a 1-foot-diameter Lazy Susan bearing between the two, and bolted everything together. The seat even had power adjustments, so (just for fun) I tucked a battery underneath.

After a while, I stripped off the seat belt doodads… and, of course, you really don’t need power adjustments after the first week.

Worked like a champ for about a decade, but even a high-end seat cushion eventually goes flat. So I swapped in a front seat salvaged from one of our cars (a Toyota Camry wagon, from back before minivans ruled the road) and that lasted another decade. It finally went flat and I swapped in the other front seat.

The 2×6-inch upright boards have slopes and cutouts that match the peculiar shape of the seat frame, with holes drilled in the wood for the metric machine bolts, and that’s a good enough anchorage for an office environment.

Chair base

Chair base

The Lazy Susan bearing is between the top plywood layer and the square corner sticking out to the front. That layer bolts to the bottom sheet, providing enough clearance for the various heads and whatnot.

You really need six casters on a fairly large base, because the chair is immensely heavy (it was, after all, designed to not fall apart during a full-on collision) and rather top-and-back-heavy without you in place.

Considerations:

  • Get the seat close to the right height, as the adjustment range isn’t all that wide
  • Put your center of gravity in the middle of the base. Fortunately, the seat has plenty of forward-aft adjustment
  • Get the seat base pretty much horizontal

A closer look at the front:

Front detail

Front detail

The back isn’t a lot different:

Back detail

Back detail

Maybe I just have a weird butt or don’t spend enough money on office chairs.

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