Posts Tagged M2

3D Printed Chain Mail Again

Everybody likes chain mail, so I made a few big sheets:

Chain Mail Sheet

Chain Mail Sheet

That’s a nominal 150 mm on the X axis and 200 mm on the Y, which pretty well fills the M2’s 8×10 inch platform after Slic3r lays a few skirt threads around the outside. All 192 links require a bit under four hours to print: all those short movements never let the platform get up to full speed.

Look no further for a brutal test of platform alignment and adhesion. The platform is slightly too high in the left front corner and, no surprise, slightly too low in the right rear. The skirt thread varies from 0.15 to 0.27 around the loop.

Hairspray works wonder to glue down all those little tiny links. They pop off the platform quite easily after it cools under 50 °C, with no need for any post-processing.

This version of the OpenSCAD code correctly figures the number of links to fill a given width & length; the old code didn’t get it quite right.

Coloring the links makes the whole thing easier to look at:

Chain Mail Sheet - detail

Chain Mail Sheet – detail

The real world version comes out in red PLA that saturates Sony imagers:

Chain Mail - flexed

Chain Mail – flexed

It really is that flexible!

The OpenSCAD source code:

// Chain Mail Sheet
// For Slic3r and M2 printer
// Ed Nisley KE4ZNU - Apr 2013
//   Oct 2013 - larger links, better parameterization
//   Nov 2014 - fix size calculation, add coloration

Layout = "Show";			// Link Build Show

//-------
//- Extrusion parameters must match reality!
//  Print with +0 shells and 6 solid layers

ThreadThick = 0.20;
ThreadWidth = 0.40;

HoleWindage = 0.2;

Protrusion = 0.1;			// make holes end cleanly

function IntegerMultiple(Size,Unit) = Unit * ceil(Size / Unit);

//-------
// Dimensions

BarThreads = 6;
BarWidth = BarThreads * ThreadWidth;

BarThick = 4 * ThreadThick;

LinkSquare = IntegerMultiple(2.5*BarThreads,ThreadWidth);
LinkHeight = 2*BarThick + 4*ThreadThick;           // bars + clearance

echo(str("Link height: ",LinkHeight));

LinkOutDiagonal = LinkSquare*sqrt(2) - BarWidth;
LinkInDiagonal = LinkSquare*sqrt(2) - 2*(BarWidth/2 + BarWidth*sqrt(2));

echo(str("Outside diagonal: ",LinkOutDiagonal));

LinkSpacing = 0.60 * LinkOutDiagonal;		// totally empirical
echo(str("Link spacing: ",LinkSpacing));

SheetSizeX = 150;
SheetSizeY = 200;

NumLinksX = floor((SheetSizeX - LinkOutDiagonal) / LinkSpacing) + 1;
NumLinksY = floor((SheetSizeY - LinkOutDiagonal) / LinkSpacing) + 1;

echo(str("Links X: ",NumLinksX," Y: ",NumLinksY," Total: ",NumLinksX*NumLinksY));

//-------

module ShowPegGrid(Space = 10.0,Size = 1.0) {

  RangeX = floor(95 / Space);
  RangeY = floor(125 / Space);

	for (x=[-RangeX:RangeX])
	  for (y=[-RangeY:RangeY])
		translate([x*Space,y*Space,Size/2])
		  %cube(Size,center=true);

}

//-------
// Create basic link

module Link() {
    render()
	rotate(45)
		difference(convexity=2) {
			translate([0,0,LinkHeight/2]) {
				difference(convexity=2) {
					intersection() {		// outside shape
						cube([LinkSquare,LinkSquare,LinkHeight],center=true);
						rotate(45)
							cube([LinkOutDiagonal,LinkOutDiagonal,LinkHeight],center=true);
					}
					intersection() {		// inside shape
						cube([(LinkSquare - 2*BarWidth),(LinkSquare - 2*BarWidth),(LinkHeight + 2*Protrusion)],center=true);
						rotate(45)
							cube([LinkInDiagonal,LinkInDiagonal,(LinkHeight +2*Protrusion)],center=true);
					}
				}
			}
			for (i=[-1,1]) {				// create bars
				translate([0,-i*(sqrt(2)*BarWidth/2),BarThick])
					rotate(45 + 180*(i+1)/2)
						cube([LinkOutDiagonal,LinkOutDiagonal,LinkHeight]);
				translate([i*(sqrt(2)*BarWidth/2),0,-BarThick])
					rotate(135 + 180*(i+1)/2)
						cube([LinkOutDiagonal,LinkOutDiagonal,LinkHeight]);
			}
		}
}

//-------
// Build it!

ShowPegGrid();

if (Layout == "Link") {
  Link();

}

if (Layout == "Build" || Layout == "Show") {
	for (ix=[-(NumLinksX/2 - 0):(NumLinksX/2 - 1)])
		for (iy=[-(NumLinksY/2 - 0):(NumLinksY/2 - 1)])
			translate([ix*LinkSpacing + LinkSpacing/2,iy*LinkSpacing + LinkSpacing/2,0])
				if (Layout == "Show")
					color([0.5+(ix/NumLinksX),0.5+(iy/NumLinksY),1.0]) Link();
				else Link();
}

2 Comments

Poughkeepsie Mini Maker Faire: 3D Printing Status Report

The Poughkeepsie paper had a short writeup on last Saturday’s Mini Maker Faire, featuring exactly one picture (it’s their Copyrighted Work, so I can’t show it here): my hotrodded M2 with a platform of Tux penguins from the chocolate mold project.

I passed out samples:

Tux Gradient 4x4 - milk chocolate detail

Tux Gradient 4×4 – milk chocolate detail

Of course, I told the kids that Santa was on their side for getting a 3D printer under the tree…

Rumors from usually reliable sources indicate the two other 3D printers at the Faire had, shall we say, reliability issues and generally weren’t running. The M2 ran continuously from 10 am through 4 pm, cranking out eight Tuxes at a time, with no trouble at all; perhaps that’s why it got its picture in the paper.

By and large: It. Just. Works.

I did a presentation on (my opinion of) the current state of Personal 3D Printing, using jimc’s impeccable projects to show how enough skill can cure the usual striated sidewalls, plus other examples and advice from MakerGear forum members.

A good time was had by all!

My voice may return by early next week…

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Kenmore 158: LED Strip and Sensor Cable

The shaft position and motor RPM sensors require +5 VDC, the LED strip lights run on +12 VDC, and the yet-to-be-built needle lights in the endcap probably need an entirely different supply. After a bit of doodling, all that, plus a power button conductor, fits into nine conductors:

  1. K – +5 VDC for sensors
  2. Bn – common for sensors
  3. R – RPM sensor output
  4. O – Shaft position sensor output
  5. Y – Power button
  6. G – +12 VDC for LED strips
  7. Bl – common for strips
  8. V – + supply for needle lights
  9. W – common for lights

That’s fortunate, as I have a box of pre-built RS-232 cables. The nine color-coded 24 AWG (more or less) conductors seem a bit scanty for LED strip light currents, but they’ll suffice for now.

Everything terminates in a hideous shrub down by the motor pulley, with cable ties holding the wires away from the action:

LED Strips and Sensor - cable terminations

LED Strips and Sensor – cable terminations

Unlike the PS/2 connector for the foot pedal, mounting the DB9 “serial” connector required some bashing:

LED and Sensor DB9 - mounting

LED and Sensor DB9 – mounting

A pair of 4-40 washers, filed to fit inside the chassis cutout and away from the shell, keep the connector from rotating / sliding; the dimensions aren’t conducive to a 3D printed widget. The flat metal strips hold the connector in place, with the mounting screws threaded into 4-40 nuts behind the connector.

The top row of pins goes to a header (a bit fuzzy, near the bottom of the image) on the Low Voltage Interface board, where the sensor inputs go directly to the Arduino Pro Mini and the power connections to the ATX connector:

Low Voltage Interface Board - top view

Low Voltage Interface Board – top view

The LED power connections on the bottom row go to pins on an ATX wiring harness that used to send juice to the various disk drives.

I’m not real happy with that lashup, but … more pondering is in order. I suspect I’ll need a few more conductors for other things on the sewing machine, so a larger cable may terminate at a DB25 connector in the cutout just above this one.

,

7 Comments

Kenmore 158: Shaft Position Sensor

In order to stop the sewing machine with the needle either up or down, the controller must know the angular position of the main shaft. Fortunately, the shaft has a counterweight in a not-too-inconvenient location behind the handwheel:

Kenmore 158 - main shaft counterweight

Kenmore 158 – main shaft counterweight

The needle is fully down with the shaft in that position. I originally thought about putting a pair of sensors adjacent to the lower edge, but because the motor can rotate the shaft only counterclockwise (as seen from this end), watching a single sensor tells you everything you need to know:

  • Falling edge: needle at top
  • Rising edge: needle at bottom

N.B.: Although you can rotate the shaft backwards by hand, the controller needs to know the position only when stopping.

Some fiddling around showed that a TCRT5000 sensor board would fit neatly below the frame cross flange at exactly the right spot:

Shaft position sensor - in place

Shaft position sensor – in place

The counterweight now sports a strip of stainless steel tape (normally used on HVAC ductwork) burnished to a high shine:

Kenmore 158 Shaft Counterweight - burnished steel tape

Kenmore 158 Shaft Counterweight – burnished steel tape

The tape tucks around the counterweight to keep the wind out of its hair:

Kenmore 158 Shaft Counterweight - steel tape ends

Kenmore 158 Shaft Counterweight – steel tape ends

The handwheel spins on that smooth ring near the end of the shaft and covers the outer half of the counterweight, so the tape brightens up the only part of the counterweight that the sensor can see.

The sensor mounts on a fiddly bit of plastic that’s ideally suited for 3D printing:

Shaft Position Sensor Mount - left

Shaft Position Sensor Mount – left

The rectangular recess fits around the protruding trimpot leads, a screw in the hole fastens the sensor, the flange on the top fits against the inside edge of the frame flange to position the sensor head axially along the shaft, and the cutout to the left rear clears the whirling crank bearing on the shaft.

It looked good on the bench:

Shaft sensor mount - trial fit

Shaft sensor mount – trial fit

Rather than mess around with more connectors, I removed the pins and soldered a hank of CD-ROM audio cable (remember CD-ROMs?) directly into the top three holes.

After scrubulating the bottom of the frame flange with denatured alcohol, a square of double-stick foam tape holds the mount to the frame, eyeballometrically aligned to the proper position:

Kenmore 158 Shaft position sensor - end view

Kenmore 158 Shaft position sensor – end view

That may be slightly too close to the counterweight, as the ideal distance is about 2 mm. The source code can add a shim that moves the mounting plane straight down, allowing the whole thing to move slightly to the left: increase the clearance while maintaining the same angular position. The next version will have a 1 mm BaseShim and we’ll see how that goes.

You could mirror the mount to put another sensor at the quadrature position on the right side of the counterweight.

It’s getting closer to becoming a simple matter of software…

The OpenSCAD source code:

// Shaft Position Sensor Mount
// Ed Nisley - KE4ZNU - October 2014

Layout = "Show";

//- Extrusion parameters must match reality!

ThreadThick = 0.20;
ThreadWidth = 0.40;

HoleWindage = 0.2;			// extra clearance

Protrusion = 0.1;			// make holes end cleanly

AlignPinOD = 1.70;			// assembly alignment pins: filament dia

function IntegerMultiple(Size,Unit) = Unit * ceil(Size / Unit);

//----------------------
// Dimensions

SensorWidth = 14.0;			// sensor PCB width
SensorLength = 21.0;		//  ... contact patch length
NumSensors = 1;

SensorScrewOffset = 5.0;	//  ... mounting hole to frame edge

PotLeads = [5.0,8.0,1.0];	// trimpot lead recess
PotOffset = [-1.5,8.5,0];

SensorScrewHeadOD = 6.0;	//  ... mounting screw head dia
SensorScrewTap = 2.25;		//  ... screw tap diameter
SensorScrewLength = 4.0;	//  ... screw length inside block

BaseShim = 1.0;				// additional height to align sensors
BaseAngle = 45;				// downward from horizontal

BaseSensors = NumSensors*SensorWidth;		// length along slanted top

BaseLength = BaseSensors*cos(BaseAngle);
BaseHeight = BaseSensors*sin(BaseAngle);

echo(str("Angle: ",BaseAngle," Height: ",BaseHeight," Length: ",BaseLength));

FrameWidth = 13.0;			// machine frame width

LipHeight = 3.0;			// locates part on frame to position sensors
LipWidth = IntegerMultiple(2.0,ThreadWidth);

Block = [BaseLength,
		 (FrameWidth + SensorScrewOffset + SensorScrewHeadOD/2),
		 (BaseHeight + BaseShim + LipHeight)];

echo(str("Block size: ",Block));

//----------------------
// Useful routines

module PolyCyl(Dia,Height,ForceSides=0) {			// based on nophead's polyholes

  Sides = (ForceSides != 0) ? ForceSides : (ceil(Dia) + 2);

  FixDia = Dia / cos(180/Sides);

  cylinder(r=(FixDia + HoleWindage)/2,
           h=Height,
           $fn=Sides);
}

module ShowPegGrid(Space = 10.0,Size = 1.0) {

  RangeX = floor(100 / Space);
  RangeY = floor(125 / Space);

	for (x=[-RangeX:RangeX])
	  for (y=[-RangeY:RangeY])
		translate([x*Space,y*Space,Size/2])
		  %cube(Size,center=true);

}

//-- Build the sensor mount

module SensorMount() {

	difference() {
		translate([0,(FrameWidth - Block[1]),0])
			cube(Block);

		translate([-Block[0],0,(Block[2] - LipHeight)])		// machine frame
			cube([3*Block[0],(FrameWidth + Protrusion),Block[2]]);

		translate([0,-Block[1]/2,0])						// sensor angle
			rotate([0,(90 - BaseAngle),0])
				cube(2*Block);

		translate([-SensorScrewLength/cos(90 - BaseAngle),-(2*Block[1] + LipWidth),0])
			rotate([0,-BaseAngle,0])						// remove all but lip on crank side
				cube(2*Block);

		for (i=[0:(NumSensors - 1)])						// screw hole
			rotate([0,(-BaseAngle),0])
				translate([(SensorWidth/2 + i*SensorWidth),-SensorScrewOffset,-Protrusion])
					PolyCyl(SensorScrewTap,(SensorScrewLength + 2*Protrusion),6);

		for (i=[0:(NumSensors - 1)])						// pot lead recess
			rotate([0,(-BaseAngle),0])
				translate(PotOffset + [i*SensorWidth + SensorWidth/2 - PotLeads[0]/2,
						-(SensorScrewOffset + PotLeads[1]/2),
						-Protrusion])
					cube(PotLeads + [0,0,Protrusion]);
	}
}

//----------------------
// Build it

ShowPegGrid();

if (Layout == "Show")
	SensorMount();

if (Layout == "Build")
	translate([-SensorWidth,0,0])
		rotate([0,(90 - BaseAngle),0])
			SensorMount();

,

2 Comments

Kenmore 158: Hall Effect Pedal Connector

Built back in 2004, the Dell GX270 PC had PS/2 keyboard and mouse ports on its back panel, so I put a PS/2 plug on the cable from the Hall effect sensor in the foot pedal. Although the original sockets mounted on a complex system board structure that I can’t repurpose, it’s easy enough to conjure up a mount for a single socket on the back panel:

PS2 Socket Mount

PS2 Socket Mount

A quick fit check verified the dimensions:

PS2 Connector mount - trial fit on platform

PS2 Connector mount – trial fit on platform

Astonishingly, the socket slid firmly into its slot. I love it when that happens on the first try!

The flat plate in front of the mount snaps into the chassis cutout to locate the 2-56 screw hole positions:

PS2 Mount - drill guide

PS2 Mount – drill guide

The screws thread directly into the mount, with the holes tapped for 2-56. PLA isn’t all that strong, but there’s enough meat to hold the mount firmly enough for my simple purposes.

And it looks pretty good, in a post-apocalyptic missing-windows sort of way:

PS2 Connector mount - in place

PS2 Connector mount – in place

That was easy…

The OpenSCAD source code:

// PS/2 Socket Mount
// Ed Nisley - KE4ZNU - October 2014

Layout = "Build";			// Build Socket Guide

//- Extrusion parameters must match reality!

ThreadThick = 0.20;
ThreadWidth = 0.40;

HoleWindage = 0.2;			// extra clearance

Protrusion = 0.1;			// make holes end cleanly

AlignPinOD = 1.70;			// assembly alignment pins: filament dia

function IntegerMultiple(Size,Unit) = Unit * ceil(Size / Unit);

//----------------------
// Dimensions

Socket = [14.1,13.3,13.0];	// PS/2 socket outline, minus tabs & wires on bottom

Flange = 6.0;

WallThick = IntegerMultiple(2.0,ThreadWidth);

Mount = Socket + [2*Flange,WallThick,WallThick];

ScrewTap = 1.90;			// 2-56 tap for machine screws

ScrewOC = 19.0;

echo(str("Screw OC: ",ScrewOC));

ChassisHole = [13.0,13.0,1.0];
GuideLayers = IntegerMultiple(0.5,ThreadThick);

//----------------------
// Useful routines

module PolyCyl(Dia,Height,ForceSides=0) {			// based on nophead's polyholes

  Sides = (ForceSides != 0) ? ForceSides : (ceil(Dia) + 2);

  FixDia = Dia / cos(180/Sides);

  cylinder(r=(FixDia + HoleWindage)/2,
           h=Height,
           $fn=Sides);
}

module ShowPegGrid(Space = 10.0,Size = 1.0) {

  RangeX = floor(100 / Space);
  RangeY = floor(125 / Space);

	for (x=[-RangeX:RangeX])
	  for (y=[-RangeY:RangeY])
		translate([x*Space,y*Space,Size/2])
		  %cube(Size,center=true);

}

//-- Build the mount

module SocketMount() {
	
	difference() {
		translate([0,Mount[1]/2,Mount[2]/2])
			cube(Mount,center=true);
		
		translate([0,Socket[1]/2,Socket[2]/2])
			cube(Socket + [0,Protrusion,Protrusion],center=true);
			
		for (i=[-1,1])							// holes centered on socket, not mount
			translate([i*ScrewOC/2,-Protrusion,Socket[2]/2])
				rotate([-90,0,0])
					rotate(180/6)
						PolyCyl(ScrewTap,Mount[1] + 2*Protrusion,6);
	}
}

//-- Totally ad-hoc drill guide to center holes on PS/2 cutout

module DrillGuide() {
	
	union() {
		intersection() {
			translate([0,0,GuideLayers])
				cube([2*Mount[0],2*Mount[1],2*GuideLayers],center=true);
			translate([0,-Socket[2]/2,Mount[1]])
				rotate([-90,0,0])
					SocketMount();
		}

		translate([0,0,Protrusion])
			linear_extrude(height=(3*GuideLayers - Protrusion)) {
				circle(d=ChassisHole[0],$fn=8*4);
				translate([-ChassisHole[0]/2,0])
					square([ChassisHole[0],(ChassisHole[1] - ChassisHole[0]/2)],center=false);
			}

	}
}


//----------------------
// Build it

ShowPegGrid();

if (Layout == "Socket")
	SocketMount();

if (Layout == "Guide")
	DrillGuide();

if (Layout == "Build") {
	translate([0,-Mount[2],0])
		DrillGuide();
	translate([0,0,Mount[1]])
		rotate([-90,0,0])
			SocketMount();
}

,

1 Comment

Kenmore 158 LED Strip Lighting: Now With Improved Wiring!

It Has Been Decided (in that place where what is decided must be) to allow a single hole in the sewing machine’s front panel:

Kenmore 158 - Front LED strip - wire routing

Kenmore 158 – Front LED strip – wire routing

The hole barely passes the 2 mm coaxial cable I’m misusing for the LED strips and is located where it:

  • Clears the machine’s metal frame to the upper left
  • Isn’t blocked by the knob’s mounting bracket to the lower right
  • Doesn’t snag the knob’s cam followers all over the insides
  • Lines up directly below the orange dot for pretty

The first three of those happen behind the front panel, inside the frame, where you (well, I) can neither see nor measure the locations. I used a large outside caliper to get a feel for where the hole could possibly fit, then got it right on the first try!

On the rear panel, it turns out that the presser foot lever doesn’t quite touch the top of its slot in the frame, so the cable for those LED strips can sneak through:

Kenmore 158 - Rear LED strips - wire routing

Kenmore 158 – Rear LED strips – wire routing

Just inside that slot, the cable turns right, passes into the endcap, then goes upward to re-emerge at the top, inside the channel used for the old 120 VAC zip cord that powered the incandescent bulb in the endcap.

I had some square cable clips lying around, so I used them, but the (yet to be designed) round versions will look better.

The grody frame tells you this is the crash test dummy machine I’m using to verify things before installing them in Mary’s machine.

The improved cable routing required different hole positions in the LED strip mounts:

Strip Light Mount - Drilled cable routing

Strip Light Mount – Drilled cable routing

The internal wire route follows the original 120 VAC zip cord’s route from the bottom of the machine to the endcap (on the left), with the new branch for the front LEDs curving over the main shaft:

Kenmore 158 - LED strips - internal wire routing

Kenmore 158 – LED strips – internal wire routing

The four-conductor ribbon cable also carries the supply voltage for the yet-to-be-built high intensity LED emitters in the end cap that will replace the 10 mm LEDs, with the ends terminated under the clamp in the middle. Those old steel wire clamps seem grossly oversized for the job, but that’s OK with me.

The ribbon cable eases past that whirling crank arm, then passes through the frame to the outside cover under the handwheel, where it just barely clears the drive belts. A few zip ties hold it out of the way.

The OpenSCAD source code offsets the wiring holes by 0.5 mm from the ends of the LED strips for easier wire bending, but is otherwise pretty much the same as before:

// LED Strip Lighting Brackets for Kenmore Model 158 Sewing Machine
// Ed Nisley - KE4ZNU - March 2014
//  October 2014 - tweak endcap length & channel position

Layout = "Build";			// Build Show Channels Strip

//- Extrusion parameters must match reality!
//  Print with 2 shells and 3 solid layers

ThreadThick = 0.20;
ThreadWidth = 0.40;

HoleWindage = 0.2;			// extra clearance

Protrusion = 0.1;			// make holes end cleanly

AlignPinOD = 1.70;			// assembly alignment pins: filament dia

inch = 25.4;

function IntegerMultiple(Size,Unit) = Unit * ceil(Size / Unit);

//----------------------
// Dimensions

LEDSegment = [25.0,10.0,3.0];		//  size of each LED segment
SEGLENGTH = 0;
SEGWIDTH = 1;
SEGHEIGHT = 2;

WireChannel = 3.0;				// wire routing channel diameter

StripHeight = 12.0;				// sticky tape width

DefaultLayout = [1,2,"Wire","NoWire"];
NUMSEGS = 0;
NUMSTRIPS = 1;
WIRELEFT = 2;
WIRERIGHT = 3;

EndCapSides = 8*4;				// endcap smoothness
EndCapShim = 0.5;				// additional space for easier wire bending

function EndCapSize(Layout) = [(2*WireChannel + EndCapShim),Layout[NUMSTRIPS]*LEDSegment[SEGWIDTH],StripHeight];

//----------------------
// Useful routines

module PolyCyl(Dia,Height,ForceSides=0) {			// based on nophead's polyholes

  Sides = (ForceSides != 0) ? ForceSides : (ceil(Dia) + 2);

  FixDia = Dia / cos(180/Sides);

  cylinder(r=(FixDia + HoleWindage)/2,
           h=Height,
           $fn=Sides);
}

module ShowPegGrid(Space = 10.0,Size = 1.0) {

  RangeX = floor(100 / Space);
  RangeY = floor(125 / Space);

	for (x=[-RangeX:RangeX])
	  for (y=[-RangeY:RangeY])
		translate([x*Space,y*Space,Size/2])
		  %cube(Size,center=true);

}

//-- The negative space used to thread wires into the endcap

module MakeWireChannel(Layout = DefaultLayout,Which = "Left") {

	EndCap = EndCapSize(Layout);	// radii of end cap spheroid

	HalfSpace = EndCap[0] * ((Which == "Left") ? 1 : -1);

	render(convexity=2)
	translate([0,LEDSegment[SEGWIDTH]/2,0])
		intersection() {
			union() {
				cube([2*WireChannel,WireChannel,EndCap[2]],center=true);
				translate([-2*EndCap[0],0,EndCap[2]/2])
					rotate([0,90,0]) rotate(180/6)
						PolyCyl(WireChannel,4*EndCap[0],6);
			}
			translate([HalfSpace,0,(EndCap[2] - Protrusion)]) {
				cube(2*EndCap,center=true);
			}
		}
}

//-- The whole strip, minus wiring channels

module MakeStrip(Layout = DefaultLayout) {

	EndCap = EndCapSize(Layout);	// radii of end cap spheroid

	BarLength = Layout[NUMSEGS] * LEDSegment[SEGLENGTH];				// central bar length

	echo(str("Strip OAL: ",BarLength + 2*EndCap[SEGLENGTH]));

	hull()
		difference() {
			for (x = [-1,1])						// endcaps as spheroids
				translate([x*BarLength/2,0,0])
					resize(2*EndCap) rotate([0,90,0]) sphere(1.0,$fn=EndCapSides);
			translate([0,0,-EndCap[2]])
				cube([2*BarLength,3*EndCap[1],2*EndCap[2]],center=true);
			translate([0,-EndCap[1],0])
				cube([2*BarLength,2*EndCap[1],3*EndCap[2]],center=true);
		}

}

//-- Cut wiring channels out of strip

module MakeMount(Layout = DefaultLayout) {

	BarLength = Layout[NUMSEGS] * LEDSegment[SEGLENGTH];

	difference() {
		MakeStrip(Layout);
		if (Layout[WIRELEFT] == "Wire")
			translate([(BarLength/2 + EndCapShim),0,0])
				MakeWireChannel(Layout,"Left");
		if (Layout[WIRERIGHT] == "Wire")
			translate([-(BarLength/2 + EndCapShim),0,0])
				MakeWireChannel(Layout,"Right");
	}
}

//- Build it

ShowPegGrid();

if (Layout == "Channels") {
	translate([ (2*WireChannel + 1.0),0,0]) MakeWireChannel(DefaultLayout,"Left");
	translate([-(2*WireChannel + 1.0),0,0]) MakeWireChannel(DefaultLayout,"Right");
}

if (Layout == "Strip") {
	MakeStrip(DefaultLayout);
}

if (Layout == "Show") {
	MakeMount(DefaultLayout);
}

if (Layout == "Build") {

	if (false) {					// original no-drill wiring
		translate([0,(3*LEDSegment[SEGWIDTH]),0]) MakeMount([1,2,"Wire","Wire"]);		// rear left side, vertical
		translate([0,0,0]) MakeMount([5,2,"Wire","NoWire"]);				// rear top, across arm
		translate([0,-(3*LEDSegment[SEGWIDTH]),0]) MakeMount([6,2,"NoWire","Wire"]);	// front top, across arm
	}

	if (true) {						// front: drill panel, rear: route through foot lift lever
		translate([0,(3*LEDSegment[SEGWIDTH]),0])
			MakeMount([1,2,"NoWire","Wire"]);				// rear left side, vertical
		translate([0,0,0])
			MakeMount([5,2,"Wire","Wire"]);					// rear top, across arm
		translate([0,-(1*LEDSegment[SEGWIDTH]),0])
			rotate(180)
			MakeMount([6,2,"NoWire","Wire"]);				// front top, across arm
	}
}

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2 Comments

Search Engine Optimization: Replacement Shelf Bracket Whirlpool Freezer

If I were selling those brackets, I’d be rich:

Search Engine Optimization - Freezer Shelf Bracket

Search Engine Optimization – Freezer Shelf Bracket

Now, that looks like Search Engine Optimization it is to die for! Google will give you a different set of pictures, but I own that all-important top row.

Alas, anybody can just print their own…

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2 Comments