KG-UV3D GPS+Voice: Quasi-Extruded Case

Unlike the previous kludge, this GPS interface case resembles an extrusion with the PCBs sliding into place, held by setscrews along the edges of the slots:

HT-GPS Adapter Case - end view

HT-GPS Adapter Case - end view

Those errant threads seem to arise from not quite bonding to the corner. The battery side of the case (bottom in this view) is one thread wide, which isn’t quite enough. Adding another thread makes it 1 mm wide, which seems excessive.

The idea was to glue the battery interface plate on that side, but printing the case vertically puts various flaws along that surface:

HT-GPS Adapter Case - bottom view

HT-GPS Adapter Case - bottom view

So the next iteration will merge the battery plate with the case and print the whole affair in one shot. This view shows all the parts separately:

HT-GPS Adapter Case - exploded bottom view

HT-GPS Adapter Case - exploded bottom view

This shows the case joined with the battery plate, neatly aligned for printing:

HT-GPS Adapter Case - combined battery interface

HT-GPS Adapter Case - combined battery interface

The battery plate has a 0.1 mm extension into the case to avoid problems from objects with coincident planes. Unfortunately, however, that means the intersection between the base plate and the shell forms a line with three planes extending from it: the two outside walls (which are co-planar) and the plate extension inside the case. Skeinforge sometimes complains mightily about that, despite my having applied a union() to fuse the plate with the case: obviously I don’t quite understand how union() works.

I think the battery contact holes will come out close enough to being right; they all have points on the top edge to reduce the overhang problem.

One gotcha: the actual metallic contact studs for the battery. The contacts for the ICOM IC-Z1A case came from carefully shaped brass screws secured by nuts above the PCB and that’s what I’ve been designing around for this case. Unfortunately, the PCB must slide in before installing the studs, which means reaching into the depths of the case, with all the wiring in the way, to turn those nuts. Fortunately, the PCB has plenty of clearance in that direction, but … it’ll be awkward at best.

The studs also need a slot / socket / dingus to prevent rotation while tightening the nuts; right now the contact plate is circular-ish, but maybe I should rethink that.

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