CH-47 Flyover

I have no idea what’s going on around here any more…

CH-47 helicopter formation

CH-47 helicopter formation

Those northbound CH-47 Chinooks looked to be barely over treetop level, but the rotors are 60 feet in diameter and they were much higher than they seemed. Shook the house and brought all hands outside to watch the show.

I remember getting a tour inside one, a long time ago, at a military air show.

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  1. #1 by PeterNL on 25-March-2012 - 08:25

    Could it be they’ve picked up strange signals and have traced it in your general direction, or maybe even to your house…. Suspecting there is terrorist activity going on? And sending out the heavy machinery to deal with the perceived threat?

    Either that, or it’s my imagination running wild….

    Maybe it’s time to add a extra few caps and ferrite beads to your FET-tester…. who knows what signals it’s radiating that’s setting off the alarmbells at the Pentagon…..

    • #2 by Ed on 25-March-2012 - 09:14

      No need for helicopters…

  2. #3 by Aki on 25-March-2012 - 08:37

    “It Came Out of the Sky” … Where is my camera?

    F-18 D Hornet the “Frankenplane”

    http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache_details.aspx?wp=GC239MZ

    • #4 by Ed on 25-March-2012 - 09:11

      Ouch. That left a mark…

  3. #5 by Aki on 26-March-2012 - 03:10

    “Devil in Disguise” – before the firmware update … or after…

    JAS Gripen Crash

    • #6 by Ed on 26-March-2012 - 08:11

      And that, children, is why we no longer allow airshow flights to direct energy toward the crowd…

      Which, admittedly, is hard to avoid when you’re doing a show over an area that looks a lot like a city. What could possibly go wrong, eh?

  4. #7 by Aki on 26-March-2012 - 11:33

    Sometimes the weather is simply too fresh to fly – at least the instruments of Jas go crazy.

    “Jas can not handle warm weather ”

    http://www.bgdna.com/energy-green-tech/jas-can-not-handle-warm-weather.html

    Warm weather? High pressure in January means often here -30C (on earth surface), so I wouldn’t go out in swimwear.

    • #8 by Ed on 26-March-2012 - 13:18

      The cheap barometer behind me tops out at just under 1070 mb = 1070 hPa. You’d think an aircraft instrument would have a larger adjustment range than that

  5. #9 by Aki on 26-March-2012 - 14:00

    The first flight instrument – yaw string, still in use.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yaw_string

    • #10 by PeterNL on 26-March-2012 - 15:50

      Not only is it still in use – it’s the most-used instrument in a glider! You can estimate speed by the sound of the air, you can guesstimate height by looking outside, you can feel upward/downward acceleration (variometer)…. but to make coordinated turns, nothing beats that piece of wooly string!

      Flying gliders without instruments was never much of a problem for me… but when that piece of string got tangled or stuck, that I always found much more annoying…. having to ‘guess’ at coordinated turns… not nice, especially not at low heights in pattern….

      And I thought this remnant of the past was only used in gliders, but see it’s also used in the U2? Impressive. Then again, the U2 is basically a glider….. :-D

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